October 2015 - Aesthetic Post


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Listening / Viewing: Reptile Youth – Arab Spring Break (I & II)

Directed by Daniel Kragh-Jacobsen.

An Aesthete’s Halloween

Halloween Guide

1. Fendi Monster Sweater, $700; 2. Death’s Door White Whisky, $30; 3. Byredo Apocalyptic Candle, $80; 4. Ghost Lamp by Shiro Kuramata, $5,800; 5. Kenzo Eye Print Slip-On, $210

Halloween Guide

6. Armani Eyes To Kill Eye Pencil, $28; 7. Black Rock Candy Sticks, $15 for 18 pieces; 8. The Row Respo Cape Coat, $3950; 9. Comme des Garçons Wallet, $175; 10. 1970s Brutalist Spider Lamp, $2250

Piece in Brief: Toio Floor Lamp

Toio Floor Lamp

Toio Floor Lamp

Toio Floor Lamp

Designed in 1962 by Italian brothers Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, the Toio (a witty translation of “toy”) lamp was part of their ready-made object series. The floor lamp consists of a 300-watt automobile headlamp that rests upward at the top of a long nickel-plated stem, the electrical cord guided by fishing rod rings to the transformer and cleated base, similar to that found on a boat or ship. A prime example of Italian Industrial Design, Toio is part of the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection.

In 1938 Pier Giacomo Castiglioni and his elder brother, Livio, founded a practice in Milan, which the youngest brother, Achille, joined in 1944. The Castiglioni brothers were greatly interested in the advancement and marriage of technology and art, resulting in many now classic designs that were both functional and progressive. Pier Giacomo Castiglioni is regarded as the intellectual equal of his brother Achille, and until his untimely death in 1968, Pier Giacomo collaborated with Achille on numerous design objects.

Manufactured by Flos, vintage models can be found online, as well as new, available to purchase at around $1400.

More at: Flos
Photos: Flos

Listening / Viewing: Christine and the Queens – Paradis Perdus

Directed by JACK.

Mary Weatherford: Los Angeles

Mary Weatherford: Los Angeles

Mary Weatherford: Los Angeles

Mary Weatherford: Los Angeles

Mary Weatherford: Los Angeles

Mary Weatherford: Los Angeles

Mary Weatherford: Los Angeles

Mary Weatherford: Los Angeles

In the exhibition titled Los Angeles, artist Mary Weatherford uses abstract painting and neon sculpture to interpret Los Angeles memories and places.

As described in the collection’s press release: “The paintings in the show are meditations on zones at the perceptual edges of Los Angeles, away from the landmarks traditionally associated with the city.  However, they are not intended to function as literal counterparts to specific locations, but as embodied channels through which places––and the impressions and associations they engender––suggest new forms. Painting therefore functions as a way of recreating and filtering experience, and of charting the ambient qualities of a metropolis as they intersect with the internal life of the artist who perceives them.”

The works consist of gestural abstractions in Flashe paint, overlaid with illuminated neon; Weatherford’s use of neon tubing and its wiring almost works as a line drawing itself. Another facet of the neon is that its direct light emphasizes the physical qualities of the paint and support, so that the tooth of the linen, for example, becomes a component of the work.

Mary Weatherford’s Los Angeles was first exhibited at David Kordansky Gallery last year.

More at: David Kordansky Gallery
Photos : David Kordansky Gallery

Listening / Viewing: Purple – Let Me Stay

Directed by João Retorta.

Piece in Brief: Poul Hundevad Safari Chair

Poul Hundevad Safari Chair

Poul Hundevad Safari Chair

Poul Hundevad Safari Chair

Poul Hundevad Safari Chair

Poul Hundevad Safari Chair

Listed as the PH70 or Model 60 chair, and attributed to Danish designer Poul Hundevad (most famous for his Guldhoj stool), and sometimes Kai Winding, who designed with Hundevad, this 1950s-‘60s variation of a safari chair had several iterations. The design is artfully constructed with a system of belting or ropes to keep the seat and backrest, in either leather or canvas, properly positioned and taut. Precise woodwork finishing (pictured in beech and oak) is distinctly Danish Modern and clearly rooted in traditional cabinetry. A folding version in leather, as well as a footstool in the Model 60 canvas edition were also available.

These chairs are a rare find (especially domestically), but you can locate exemplary models online, with market prices starting around $1000.

More at: 1st Dibs, Poul Hundevad
Photos (from top): Bloombury Amsterdam, Mass Modern Design (via 1st Dibs)

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

When friends pooled their money to buy a plot of land on a remote estuary in northern New Zealand, they eventually decided to build dual cabins. A thoughtful approach the vacation home, the buildings mirror each other on the outside, but have distinct personalities inside.

Designed by firm principal Nat Cheshire of Aukland-based Cheshire Architects, the cabins are entirely off-the-grid. Being only 312 square feet, both manage to accommodate a living area, kitchen, bathroom, and sleeping loft.

Charred wood exteriors and very little footprint (no driveway or yard) make for a striking placement, as Cheshire describes: “In that big long grass, it feels more like these were boats tied up at moorings in a slow-motion ocean.”

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Each unit has two side openings: one as an entrance and the other a window. There are no traditional doors, instead, a boulder acts as a step to enter one of the cabins, the other with a small fold-down deck.

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Both cabins have a functional (albeit compact) kitchen with a sink, refrigerator, gas stove, and even a dishwasher drawer, luxuries you might not expect for such a small space. Keeping the bathroom closet-sized, with the assistance of an outdoor shower, lends real estate to the rest of the space.

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Interior design-wise, specific materials were chosen to set the cabins apart: one being light, the other dark. In the light cabin, the interior walls are unfinished plywood, the kitchen nook lined in oiled eucalyptus. Furniture selections include an Ercol sofa and Arne Jacobsen floor lamp. In the dark cabin, the interior is finished in black polished panels, which have a deep sheen at night, the kitchen nook in rich brass.

More at: Cheshire Architects
Photos: Jeremy Toth, Darryl Ward

Listening / Viewing: Youth Lagoon – Highway Patrol Stun Gun

Directed by Kendy Ty.









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