April 2016 - Aesthetic Post


You are currently browsing the Aesthetic Post blog archives for April, 2016

Riviera Tables by Alfredo Häberli for DADADUM

Riviera Tables by Alfredo Häberli

Riviera Tables by Alfredo Häberli

Riviera Tables by Alfredo Häberli

Riviera Tables by Alfredo Häberli

Alfredo Häberli’s Riviera tables for DADADUM approach marble in an unexpected, direct way; one wouldn’t typically consider Carrara marble as a material to be applied to ready-to-assemble furniture, but the Riviera tables (available in coffee or end table size) can be flat-packed in a similar way to mass-produced, build-it-yourself furniture. Their interlocking design requires no additional hardware, making them easy to assemble, and mobile if need be.

Influenced by the natural stone tables of the Ticino Valley in Switzerland, the design is based on cut joints similar to those you would find in traditional wood furniture, making the system apparent and uncomplicated. The marble’s weight and natural quality give it a sense of permanence and time-honored style; beveled edges and the arches of the table bases evoke bouyancy, making for a refreshing take on stone that perfectly straddles the line of indestructible quality and modern living.

 More at: DADADUM

Casa Voltes by Sergison Bates Architects and Liebman Villavecchia

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

In the seaside Catalonian village of Cadaqués, on the site of  a ruined historic dwelling, sits Casa Voltes, a collaborative project between Sergison Bates Architects and Liebman Villavecchia of Barcelona.

The former fishing village that was, for centuries, cut off from the mainland, has a distinct architectural style; adapting new buildings to the surrounding village context and unique geography requires an extremely fine hand, with an understanding of Cadaqués’ identity.

A storied history, that includes artists and writers such as such as Picasso, García Lorca, Dalí, Duchamp, John Cage and Richard Hamilton, amongst others, is woven with both tradition and twentieth-century influence. Many cultural, as well as architectural contributions, were made to Cadaqués’ footprint during this time; as noted by Oriol Bohigas, architects such as Federico Correa, Alfonso Milá and Coderch, Harnden (American) and Bombelli (Italian), “wisely set the tone of the ’60s in Cadaqués by providing the models to develop a current of stylistic discretion” and “succeeded in understanding the geographical and social reality of the town.”

This philosophy applies to Casa Voltes; carefully working inside the parameters of village architecture, geography, and respect of the former building, the house is graceful and modern, without any sense of historic recreation.

Continue reading →

Ubi Sunt SS16

Ubi Sunt SS16

Ubi Sunt SS16

Ubi Sunt SS16

Ubi Sunt SS16

Ubi Sunt SS16

Over the past couple of years, from the smart sweatshirt, to the head-to-toe sport look, we’ve seen the return and perhaps evolution of “sweats” to real fashion. For their Spring/Summer 2016 collection, Moa Wilkman and Aidin Sanati, the creative team behind Stockholm-based Ubi Sunt, have clearly drawn influence from this movement, while also imbuing a smart amount of Swedish elegance.

Ubi Sunt’s collection is based in strong, but downplayed pieces that include tech fabric from Japan, Italian wool, and reworked cotton jersey, looking polished, but relaxed in a Nordic cool sort of way. A moody color palette, as well as the implementation of oversized coats and a couple of classically tailored pieces, provides contrast to the casual factor. In a moment where designers are tending to over-work basics, it is refreshing to see an understated approach that still remains creative; this very reduction of design to basic form allows for the pieces from this collection to stand out on their own, or simply function as well-thought wardrobe staples.

More at: Ubi Sunt
Photos: Nils Odier









© 2017, Aesthetic Post