June 2016 - Aesthetic Post


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Olafur Eliasson’s Waterfall at Versailles

Olafur Eliasson, Waterfall

Olafur Eliasson, Waterfall

Olafur Eliasson, Waterfall

As part of the Palace of Versailles’ annual contemporary art exhibition, artist Olafur Eliasson’s works are installed across the grounds, engaging visitors in a variety of ways. Eliasson, known for his large-scale installations that explore light, perception, and environmental issues, introduces unexpected experiences to Versailles, without interfering with the historic layout or landscape.

Perhaps the most striking installation is Waterfall, a monumental fountain that simulates the action of a waterfall and recalls his previous waterfall series in New York City. Viewed from front, the outpour of water appears to come from mid-air, cascading into the Grand Canal. A latticed tower of yellow steel girders provides the feature’s base; the installation is partly influenced by 15th-16th century French monarch Louis XIV’s landscape architect André Le Notre, who had planned an ambitious water feature for the garden that was never realized.

“This waterfall reinvigorates the engineering ingenuity of the past,” said Eliasson. “It is as constructed as the court was, and I’ve left the construction open for all to see – a seemingly foreign element that expands the scope of human imagination.”

Eliasson approached the château and gardens of Versailles as a site for experimentation, and all of the pieces exhibited were conceived specifically for the site. Other outdoor installations, where the theme is water, include Fog Assembly, which envelopes viewers in ring of mist, and Glacial Rock Flour Garden, introducing the residue of retracting glaciers to the grounds. Inside, mirrors and light are used to create effects and encourage visitor interaction, such as the piece titled Solar Compression, where a mirror glows with a thin rim of light, or The Curious Museum, where large-scale trompe l’oeil effects are created through reflections.

“The Versailles that I have been dreaming up is a place that empowers everyone,” said Eliasson. “It invites visitors to take control of the authorship of their experience instead of simply consuming and being dazzled by the grandeur.”

“It asks them to exercise their senses, to embrace the unexpected, to drift through the gardens, and to feel the landscape take shape through their movement.”

The exhibition is on display until October 30th, 2016, in Versailles, France.

More at: Olafur Elliason
Photos: Anders Sune Berg

Listening / Viewing: LANY – Made in Hollywood


Directed by Mckenzie Mcdermott. From the ep Make Out.

Maison Kitsuné AW16 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

As the weather grows hotter and hotter outside, it is a nice time to look forward to cool fall air, as well as the wardrobe that comes along with . . . 

Maison Kitsuné’s A/W 2016 collection, Love Rises, takes Japanese imagery head-on; Kitsuné’s bridge between Tokyo and Paris could not be more evident in this collection, as cofounders Gildas Loaëc and Kuroki Masaya found inspiration in the Hayao Miyazaki film The Wind Rises.

Mt. Fuji, sculpted Niwaki trees, and the rising sun all make graphic appearances, lending a retro feel to the pieces, still narrowly avoiding a cartoon or brand-centric vibe; less directly-themed garments, especially jackets of unexpected fabric choices and patchwork, are reminiscent of Comme des Garçons, and feature cuts that elegantly reference Japanese tradition.

With Love Rises, Kitsuné so beautifully takes it one notch further than the idea; one step ahead of an already-done Japanese theme, one ahead of preppy, and surely one ahead for the brand.

Photos: Pierpaolo Ferrari
More at: Maison Kitsuné

Drill Lamps by LeviSarha

Drill Lamps by LeviSarha

Drill Lamps by LeviSarha

Drill Lamps by LeviSarha

Drill Lamps by LeviSarha

For the Milan Furniture Fair, DAMN° magazine invited Belgian designers Levi Dethier and Sarha Duquesne, creative studio LeviSarha, to be part of the exhibition “A Matter of Perception: Tradition & Technology.” For the event, LeviSarha designed two table lamps called Drill, a reference to the process and material from which the lamps are made; the designs are artfully composed of cylinders that were extracted from blocks of basalt, the volcanic stone readily found in the southeast of Belgium, making for a harmonious balance of the natural igneous material and functional technology.

More at: LeviSarha

Life House by John Pawson / Living Architecture

Life House by John Pawson

Life House by John Pawson

Life House by John Pawson

Amidst the rolling hills of the Welsh countryside, Living Architecture commissioned architect John Pawson to create a house of serenity and beauty – Life House (or Tŷ Bywyd, as it is called in Welsh). The house serves as a retreat that can sleep up to six people, with the architectural and design intention of contemplation and restoration for its guests.

John Pawson is a master of working within the parameters of landscape, ecology, and historic importance; his portfolio is filled with minimalist homes, boutiques, and even religious spaces. Working in collaboration with philosopher and writer, as well as the founder of Living Architecture, Alain de Botton, Pawson’s approach to Life House was an uncompromisingly modern design where it would be possible to inhabit a different sort of architectural space. Luxurious in its carefully executed simplicity, the house has been influenced by Japanese design, as well as the architecture of Benedictine monks. To further inspire mental awareness and tranquility, a sequence of walks have been curated the artist Hamish Fulton.

“In this house I wanted to create a modern, secular retreat, where guests can experience the benefits of introspection, solitude, and immersion in nature,” said Pawson.

Life House by John Pawson

Life House by John Pawson

Life House by John Pawson

From the handmade Danish bricks (black on the exterior, pale grey inside), to the polished terrazzo floor, and Douglas-fir ceilings, the house’s materials and finishes were chosen for their calming and clean nature.

Life House’s floorpan is organized around two corridors that meet at a right angle: one “dark,” leading to a chamber built into the hillside, a cavernous space designed for contemplation, the other, “light,” leads to an outdoor space where the exercise of purifying the mind is also encouraged. A combined kitchen, dining area, and lounge serve as the central hub, with a layout to satisfy both complete privacy, and when it is desired, sociability and communion.

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