September 2016 - Aesthetic Post


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House in Mikage by Sides Core

House in Mikage by Sides Core

Osaka-based architecture and design studio Sides Core designed this straightforward, adaptable house in Mikage, a residential area on the outskirts of Kobe, Japan.

The two level, timber-framed house sits on a raised plot, making for a parking space in front, privacy from the street, and direct landscape views to the south. From the outside, two wood-lined square openings hint at the layout: one being a sheltered balcony on the upper level, where two bedrooms and a bathroom are placed, and on the ground floor, a terrace that connects to an open-configuration living, kitchen, and dining space. The architects conceived the dwelling as a series of “containers,” making for a flexible arrangement as the family’s needs change over time.

“Simple containers made of quality materials are the easiest to use,” said the architects. “You don’t grow tired of them, and they bring out the best in whatever is inside.”

House in Mikage by Sides Core

House in Mikage by Sides Core

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Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

As part of their Bibliotheca Universalis series, art book publishing house Taschen have rereleased their meticulous printing of Giambattista Bodoni’s masterwork. Bodoni’s Manuale Tipografico, originally published five years after his death in 1818 (with the assistance of his widow Margherita and foreman Luigi Orsi), set a definitive standard for the printing of text, with a focus on elegance and technical refinement. Official printer for the Duke of Parma, Bodoni declared that well-designed type derives its beauty from four principles: uniformity of design, sharpness and neatness, good taste, and charm. Bodoni, the typeface, continues to be used in both print and digital media to this day.

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of TypographyLook familiar? In addition to book printing and body text, variations of, and Bodoni-influenced type are prominent in fields like branding, advertising, and magazine publishing (where high gloss paper retains the crisp detail of fine serifs.)

The book consists of 142 sets of roman and italic typefaces, as well as Greek, Hebrew, Russian, Arabic, Phoenician, Armenian, Coptic, and Tibetan alphabets, and also includes field-specific and decorative print elements. One often understands typeface simply as a shape for print, but this manual illustrates the importance of script variation and character specificity Bodoni found essential to printing books in multiple languages, with sophistication and retention of nuance. He admired the work of John Baskerville, and studied the artistry of typographic masters Pierre Simon Fournier and Firmin Didot, but in the composition of this manual, Bodoni proceeded to create a print style that was all-new. Considering it necessary for good typography to carry a collection of main fonts large enough so that the difference between the adjacent sizes is not easily seen by a trained eye, Bodoni’s system speaks to his consummate dedication to the craft, and virtually revolutionary approach to printing before the advent of digital typography.

The manual, in this new smaller format, is not only an excellent compendium for a typophile or those interested in printing from a historical standpoint, but a great work of artistry and elegance. As a companion to the original character sets, the book includes an essay by print expert Stephan Füssel, who serves as director of the Institute of the History of the Book at the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz.

While we are on the subject of type, it is worth mentioning the terminology associated with printed and digital text and characters;  there is a piece worth checking out at Co.Design that thoroughly (but in a way that is easy to understand) explains the difference between “typeface” and “font.” 

More at: Taschen

“Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.”

— William Morris

Calvin Marcus: Were Good Men

Opening today at Clearing (Brooklyn), is Calvin Marcus’ second solo exhibition with the gallery, “Were Good Men.”

Consisting of thirty-nine new paintings, many forming an environmental backdrop of grass for the stand-out portraits of war-ravaged soldiers, exaggerated and extreme in their expressions, some startling, others disturbingly comical, the exhibition is an exploration of the realities of fate. Through these characterizations of men, Marcus “observes the relationship between individual and collective identities;” each body is marked with a different sovereign flag, depicting a single universal condition. The show’s title, Were Good Men, speaks to the once vital and living man, all suffering the same fate, sinking back into the grass together.

Calvin Marcus: Were Good Men

Calvin Marcus: Were Good Men

Calvin Marcus: Were Good Men

Calvin Marcus: Were Good Men

Calvin Marcus: Were Good Men

Calvin Marcus is a Los Angeles-based contemporary artist that has exhibited worldwide and is represented by Clearing and David Kordansky. His work is part of the collection at MoMA, New York and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.

Were Good Men runs September 9 through October 30 at Clearing’s Bushwick, Brooklyn gallery.

More at: C L E A R I N G
Photos: C L E A R I N G

Gold & Gray Apartment by Richard Lindvall

Gold & Gray Apartment by Richard Lindvall

Stockholm-based designer Richard Lindvall is responsible for this transformation of an old embassy space into a modernized, private apartment.

Originally consisting of a 3-walled layout, this floorpan was reconfigured as one large, just-under 1000 sq ft space. The loft-like main space includes the kitchen, dining, and living areas, all tied together through a simple material palette of concrete, muted parquet flooring, and wood fiber paneling. As a compliment to this restrained color story, three oversized brass units serve as a kitchen island, closet, and even a coffee table. 

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Gold & Gray Apartment by Richard Lindvall

Gold & Gray Apartment by Richard Lindvall

The two bathrooms are concrete-floored and have walls of blasted limestone from the island of Gotland, one includes a massive (albeit minimal) concrete bathtub, built to accommodate an entire family of five.

Gold & Gray Apartment by Richard Lindvall

Gold & Gray Apartment by Richard Lindvall

Richard Lindvall is a multi-platform designer, but works principally in interior design and concept direction. In addition to interior layout, he designs furniture and the finishings that complete his thoughtfully-approached, functional spaces.

More at: Richard Lindvall
Photos: Mikael Axelsson

Journey by Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

At the base of the Renzo Piano designed Maison Hermès in the heart of the Ginza district of Tokyo, botanist and cactus enthusiast Kohei Oda has developed a new landscape for the presentation of Hermès’ finery. The installation, “Journey,” which runs through September 26, features Oda’s unusual and astonishing plant life serving as an artful backdrop for pieces from the Hermès collection. The masterful arrangment offers a natural contrast and an unexpected air of relativity to the Hermès selections; in the larger displays, a multitude of textural cacti of varying height create an otherworldly scene, and in the smaller windows, dried plant forms interact and are entangled with the house’s accessories.

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

A favorite of The Aesthetic Post, Hiroshima-based Kohei Oda has revolutionized the “face” of cacti. From his world-renowned shop, Qusamura, to international installations, Oda’s work encourages us to reconsider plant life; by presenting cacti in unexpected ways, Oda surely engages the eye, but his horticultural experiments, including those with grafting (transplanting pieces of one plant to grow on another), move into the territory of sculpture and the extraordinary natural possibilities associated. 

Maison Hermès is not only a shopping space, but a structure that houses workshops and offices, exhibition areas, and multimedia quarters, as well as a roof garden and a courtyard with direct access to the Tokyo subway. Its cladding, composed of more than 13,000 glass blocks, developed by acclaimed architect and engineer Renzo Piano, makes for a true architectural destination. The display windows at the base of Maison Hermès are the perfect stage for artists to reexamine “window dressing.”

More at: Maison Hermès, Qusamura
Photos: Hermès









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