October 2016 - Aesthetic Post


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Listening / Viewing: Violet Sands – No Matter What


Directed by Dress Code.

Folded by Johan van Hengel

Folded by Johan van Hengel

Folded by Johan van Hengel

Produced by Muuto, Dutch designer Johan van Hengel’s Folded wall storage system is a sophisticated shelf of sorts, that suggests a simple paper fold in the material of powder-coated steel (available in three sizes and four colors). The pocketed design features hooks at the bottom, and is practical as storage or a piece for object display, suitable for any room, even as clever bedside storage.

With his studio based in Rotterdam, van Hengel’s designs marry utility and style, with a focus on function, material, and technique.

More at: Muuto, Johan van Hengel

Perch by Wesley Walters & Salla Luhtasela

Perch by Wesley Walters & Salla Luhtasela

Perch by Wesley Walters & Salla Luhtasela

Perch by Wesley Walters & Salla Luhtasela

The Perch stool, by Wesley Walters and Salla Luhtasela, is the winner of the first FDS Award, arranged by Finnish Design Shop; it is being brought to production and market by Finnish furniture manufacturer Nikari.

The graceful form of Perch perfectly suits its material, in natural or black-stained oak, with three svelte legs and a clever footrest; the design recalls Japanese aesthetics and is modern but timelessly straightforward. Inspired by an old wooden door handle in Helsinki, Perch was originally made for the duo to use during exhibition of their wares.

Aalto University students Wesley Walters and Salla Luhtasela collaborate on minimalist wood and ceramic designs, influenced by Scandinavian and Japanese design history, under the name Kaksikko, Finnish for duo or twosome.

More at: Finnish Design Shop
Photos: Riikka Kantinkoski, Pauliina Salonen, Chikako Harada

Serpentine by Osloform

Serpentine by Osloform

Serpentine by Osloform

Serpentine by Osloform

Serpentine by Osloform

Shifting the image of modern tech devices, Serpentine, by Norwegian design studio Osloform, is a minimalist stereo that acts just as much as a design furniture object as it does a high-end audio system.

Comprised of two speakers and an amplifier (available in grey or green), the beauty of Serpentine lies in the details, as much as it does the lack of extraneous design. The application of industrial materials in a luxe manner includes the exterior casing, which is made from Valchromat, a resin-bonded, dyed wood fiber product, a superior upgrade of MDF, that has a tactile finish that is modern in composition, but reminiscent of old-school design materials. A single brass volume knob echoes the handsome brass speaker screens.

A 2 x 50W IcePower from Bang & Olufsen amplifier, RIAA phono preamp, as well 10cm Tang Band bamboo-paper-cone drivers, confirm that the “heart” of Serpentine matches its elegant exterior. At the back, a simple connection panel includes a buffered line input for digital sources, as well as phono-in.

“For us, sound quality, usability, and aesthetics are equally important qualities in such a product.” said the designers.

Osloform is a design studio and production company consisting of four young Norwegian designers: Camilla Akersveen, Åsmund Engesland, Christopher Konings and Henrik Waarum. Though the team have worked and studied in different fields, they share a love of materiality that is illustrated in their minimal, finish-driven designs.

Serpentine is priced at 28000 NOK (around $3500 USD).

Photos: Istvan Virag
More at: Osloform

Listening / Viewing: Secret Sun – NHNT


Directed by Dan & Pag. From the album Cold Coast.

Crescent Dunes by Reuben Wu

Crescent Dunes by Reuben Wu

Crescent Dunes by Reuben Wu

Crescent Dunes by Reuben Wu

Crescent Dunes by Reuben Wu

Photographed in a series by Chicago-based Reuben Wu, the Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project is a solar thermal power installation that produces more than 500,000 megawatt-hours of electricity per year, located about 190 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The organized desert field of mirrors is striking from any perspective, but Wu beautifully captured the panels at dusk, when the rich depth of sky is reflected.

Built by solar power developer SolarReserve, the grouping of over 10,000 heliostats (solar mirrors), collect and focus the sun’s thermal energy to heat molten salt that flows through a 640-foot solar power tower. In turn, the system delivers reliable power to nearly 75,000 homes during its peak season, with zero emissions. It is the first utility-scale facility in the world to demonstrate the advanced molten salt storage technology.

More at: Reuben Wu, SolarReserve









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