February 2017 - Aesthetic Post


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Listening / Viewing: Leisure – Got It Bad


Directed by Joel Kefali. From the album Leisure.

As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon & Tschiember

 As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon and Tschiember

 As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon and Tschiember

 As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon and Tschiember

 As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon and Tschiember

In the picturesque, serene Swiss Alps, Douglas Gordon and Morgane Tschiember’s As close as you can for as long as it lasts is a temporary art installation produced for the biennial event Elevation 1049, supported by the LUMA Foundation. Using fire, smoke, and sound, the piece is a call-and-response between two artists, a vague allusion to the regional tradition of yodeling. Tschiember’s circular fire works with Gordon’s installed sound piece, which is based on our primal fears of unforeseen animals and the dark, under the narrative of a lonely traveler being lured through the woods surrounding Gstaad, by the reassuring smoke and warm fire, as well as the potential of companionship in this setting.

As close as you can for as long as it lasts is on view as a part of Elevation 1049 through March 19, 2017.

More at: Elevation 1049
Photos:  Stefan Altenburger

Fall 2017: Helbers & The Row

Helbers Fall 2017 (Menswear)
Helbers Fall 2017

Paul Helbers, who has previously designed at Margiela and Vuitton, was inspired by 19-century paintings by the artist Émile Friant for his fall 2017 menswear collection. Friant’s self-portraits, in rich tones of oil paint, showed a man demanding to be taken seriously by attempting to look older than his age, mostly by his style of dress, which appears more borrowed and oversized than bespoke. Rich in material, Helbers’ collection isn’t overwrought, and stays fresh, despite the tactile nature of the materials and the visual texture that alludes to layered brushstrokes. Helbers is notoriously specific with his material choices and obsession over detail, elevating dressing for comfort on every level. The lines and edges may not be sharp, but this collection is an intelligent exercise in romance meeting minimalism.

More at: Helbers


The Row Fall 2017 Ready-To-Wear
The Row Fall 2017

Similar in philosophy to Helbers’ appreciation and use of fine textiles, The Row has always been highest-quality materials and craftsmanship-based, rather than trend-driven or showy. The fall 2017 collection was perhaps further restrained than their previous work, omitting the extraneous and focusing on timelessness in a minimal palette, without being boring. Intelligent cuts and strict belting were balanced by plays on proportion, and coats that served the woman wearing them before they impressed the bystander. There is being tasteful for the sake of being tasteful, and then there is good taste; this soft power-style of dressing may be what sets The Row apart from a bevy of designers pushing whatever might be “next.”

More at: The Row

Monday Cups by Studio LileSadi & Siebring Zoetmulder

Monday Cups by Studio LileSadi

Monday Cups by Studio LileSadi

In collaboration with Siebring & Zoetmulder, Rotterdam-based Studio LileSadi have designed a collection of stackable ceramic cups for the Dutch interior brand Puik Art. 

Exploring architectural proportions and the golden ratio, as well as geometric elements used by the Memphis group, the Monday cup is thoughtfully executed, while still appearing restrained in design. A soft, tactile effect is created by blending the grey blue or cobalt pigments directly with liquid porcelain before being poured into the mold and finished, a contrast of matte exterior finish, and high gloss interior makes for a refined detail.

Founded in 2012 by the duo of Dinah Smutny and her sister Sarah, Studio LileSadi design products inspired by architecture and practicality; working closely with artisans and small businesses in the Netherlands, they subscribe to the highest craftsmanship to create timeless quality.

More at: Studio LileSadi

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

KDVA Architects conceived the FH1 House as a “modern fisherman’s house;” built into the rocky landscape, adjacent to a Norwegian fjord, the liberal use of concrete and brutalist suggestions integrate the structure to the land. At under 1000 sq ft, the home perfectly balances minimalism and elegance, without forgoing a strong Nordic identity.

Full-wall moveable glass panels fill the space with natural light, as well as bridge the outside to in with remarkable views of the surrounding landscape. A central living space is adaptable to layout preferences, and a stark, wraparound veranda serves as an outdoor extension of the home.

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

 

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

More at: KDVA
Photos: KDVA









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