March 2017 - Aesthetic Post


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Diiis Designstudio – Selection 2017

2017 Designs by Diiis Designstudio

The latest design releases from Swiss duo Diiis Designstudio are both beautifully executed and cleverly functional. Susanne Rosa and Martina Staub develop product ideas around well-chosen materials and smart simplicity, and this series of shelves and tabletop objet clearly communicate their aesthetic.

GITO and HATO are side tables that can act as living room tray tables, or a modern bedside option. A simple rectangular metal frame supports two wooden platforms at the very top and floor level, the tabletops featuring an inset metal tray that not only adds a subtle visual element to the design, but is effective to avoid water rings. 

2017 Designs by Diiis Designstudio

2017 Designs by Diiis Designstudio

In the same design language, HAWU is a bookshelf-style design that could also serve as a bar, with a form that works against a wall, or as a detached object in the room; inventive metal shelf components can be lifted at an angle to serve as a bookends. Because the structural elements of the tables are so simply shaped, each can be easily packed flat for efficiency.

2017 Designs by Diiis Designstudio

2017 Designs by Diiis Designstudio

Finally, SIM, SALA, and BIM are glass flower vessels that have an inset mirrored plate that lends unexpected appeal to simple stems.

2017 Designs by Diiis Designstudio

2017 Designs by Diiis Designstudio

More at: Diiis Designstudio

Listening / Viewing: Portugal. The Man – Feel It Still


Go to feelitstill.com for the full interactive version of the video; there you’ll find 30 tools of #theresistance to fight apathy and injustice hidden in the film.

Visible Distance / Second Sight by Jennifer Bolande

Visible Distance / Second Sight by Jennifer Bolande

As part of Desert X, the exhibition of site-specific works by various artists (from which you’ve probably seen images of the very popular Mirage, the mirror-covered house by Doug Aitken) in the Coachella Valley of California, Jennifer Bolande’s contribution Visible Distance / Second Sight, is a clever commentary on advertising and distraction. A series of standard, full-size billboards along the Gene Autry Trail, meant to be experienced from a moving car, feature photographs of the surrounding mountains, positioned in a way that at approach, can appear to align with the natural horizon. The Visible Distance / Second Sight series references the advertising technique referred to as “Burma-Shave,” named after the shaving company of the same name that used sequential placement of signs to create messaging intended to be read from a moving vehicle. If you’ve traveled this route near Palm Springs, you are familiar with the very-present billboard advertising, which can easily distract from the scenery in which it is placed, Bolande uses this opportunity to point to the striking landscape itself. 

(Desert X runs through April 30, 2017.)

More at: Desert X
Photos: Lance Gerber

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

New York-based FEIT’s latest collection, Balance, explores the nature of society and our uncertain times by connecting us to the ground, literally. With craftsmanship, select natural materials, and functionality in mind, FEIT marries the traditions of shoemaking and leatherwork, with elegant, minimal designs. These new styles (as well as the debut of a women’s line and a series of bags) reinforce FEIT’s position as not only an expert on clean luxury, but a maker that builds to last, with designs and material choices that are intended to improve with age.

Above, selections from Balance (from top) include an update on the classic court sneaker, featuring Goodyear construction and an unlined body of low-pile, vegetable-tanned English suede; the Wrap Boot is an interpretation of a Jodhpur boot, with a back lace replacing side buckles; inspired by the sailing dry bag, FEIT’s Navy Bag (available in two sizes) is a smart reimagining of a classic, with a variation consisting of a two-piece body that references the design of their hand-sewn shoes.

More at: FEIT

Reference Bookends by Henry Julier

Reference bookends by Henry Julier

Reference bookends by Henry Julier

Reference bookends by Henry Julier

While the bookend might seem like a boring design subject, Henry Julier has improved upon the very practical object in thoughtful ways. The Brooklyn-based industrial designer debuted Reference as part of Norma Studio’s exhibit In Support of Books at the LA Art Book Fair. Designed to support larger, heavy books, as well as vinyl records, with a thicker gauge than the standard sheet steel bookend, Reference won’t flex when faced with the oversized or bulky, and forgoes the old-school design of reliance on downward weight to stay in place. A minimal fold at the top echoes the base, and allows for easy movement.

More at: Henry Julier
Photos: Shengzing Zhang

Piece in Brief: Volvo 142

Volvo 142

Volvo 142

Volvo 140 series in production at their Torslanda plant.Volvo’s 140 series in production at their Torslanda plant.

Volvo 142The stylish interior was was designed with practicality and comfort in mind.

Volvo 142

The Volvo 142 is the 2-door version of the Swedish car manufacturer’s 140 series, introduced in the summer of 1967, and in production through 1974.

The 2-door model followed in the crisp, “brick” shape Volvo’s 140 series introduced, a timeless and decidedly Scandinavian alternative to the bulbous, swollen forms of American cars at the time. During its production period, the 142 saw just a couple of variations in terms of power and comfort, as well as minor design alterations (dashboard and exterior detail, including an update to the now trademark, diagonal-line front grille), the bodystyle enduring. Worth noting is Volvo’s model naming system: the first digit being the series, the second citing the number of cylinders, and the final defining the number of doors.

Slightly lower in price than the 4-door model (144), the 142 had the same technical design, apart from the number of doors; the doors were naturally longer and the front backrests could be folded forward for backseat passengers. Just over 400,000 of the 142 model were built. The 140 series emphasized safety (a Volvo hallmark) and the body was equipped with crumple zones, a hidden roll-over bar, as well as safety belts in the cabin. Because of their very high standard of safety and build quality to withstand Scandinavian winters, some considered the straightforward design of the series to be tank-like, as many consumers expected the superfluous design features of its contemporaries. Nonetheless, Volvo’s 140 series was very successful internationally, the 142, undoubtedly, the most handsome of the line.

The 140 series was designed under the direction of Jan Wilsgaard; when he designed the series, Wilsgaard employed a credo, “simple is beautiful,” this reflected in the restrained, honest design of the car that went on to become an iconic form in automobile design.

More at: Volvo Heritage
Photos: Volvo









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