Casa Voltes by Sergison Bates Architects and Liebman Villavecchia - Aesthetic Post

Casa Voltes by Sergison Bates Architects and Liebman Villavecchia

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

In the seaside Catalonian village of Cadaqués, on the site of  a ruined historic dwelling, sits Casa Voltes, a collaborative project between Sergison Bates Architects and Liebman Villavecchia of Barcelona.

The former fishing village that was, for centuries, cut off from the mainland, has a distinct architectural style; adapting new buildings to the surrounding village context and unique geography requires an extremely fine hand, with an understanding of Cadaqués’ identity.

A storied history, that includes artists and writers such as such as Picasso, García Lorca, Dalí, Duchamp, John Cage and Richard Hamilton, amongst others, is woven with both tradition and twentieth-century influence. Many cultural, as well as architectural contributions, were made to Cadaqués’ footprint during this time; as noted by Oriol Bohigas, architects such as Federico Correa, Alfonso Milá and Coderch, Harnden (American) and Bombelli (Italian), “wisely set the tone of the ’60s in Cadaqués by providing the models to develop a current of stylistic discretion” and “succeeded in understanding the geographical and social reality of the town.”

This philosophy applies to Casa Voltes; carefully working inside the parameters of village architecture, geography, and respect of the former building, the house is graceful and modern, without any sense of historic recreation.

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

Once inside, the multi-level dwelling sits in such a way that the spaces are basically stacked, but in many ways, intelligently open to one another, making the room layout not entirely apparent. The house is shared by two families, and the bedrooms have no assigned owner, but an identity instead based on architectural configuration. The underground space, which speaks to the history and site on which the house sits, is rich and from-the-earth, while the above-ground levels seem weightless, in contrast. Windows are used creatively, not only for light and ventilation, but to extend space and light across the three levels.

Use of white across the house, much of it plaster, unifies the rooms and allows light to dictate each area’s shape and sometimes unexpected architectural identity, from skewed walls and extra-high ceilings, to sudden arches, the use of light emphasizes the interior geometric tension. Many of the architectural elements, stone, clay tile, and structural details, were recovered from the existing building on site.

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

Photos: Lorenzo Kàràsz
More at: Sergison Bates, Liebman Villavecchia

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