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Vipp Loft

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp, the Danish company most known for their metal pedal bin, introduced in 1939, continues to reach into multiple facets of design, this time with their self-service concept hotel. Rather than a multi-room complex, the Vipp hotel consists of single spaces in multiple locations. Their first, the Vipp shelter, a prefab the company debuted a couple of years ago, is now available nightly, and sits in the Swedish wilderness. Most recently, the brand opened the doors to Vipp loft, a 400-square-meter space atop an old printing factory in Copenhagen, that also houses the Vipp office. Conceptualized by Studio David Thulstrup, the loft frames the brand’s design philosophy, and offers all the comforts of a home, including a fully outfitted Vipp kitchen and dining area, three outdoor terraces, and fireplace. Vipp’s “rooms” have a stocked fridge, bath products by Aèsop, bedding by Aiayu, and the brand’s own organic cotton towels. Vipp plans to add more “rooms” to the hotel line, including Chimney House, a landmark building that was once a water pumping station near the harbor of northern Copenhagen.

More at: Vipp

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

Designed by Kusatsu-based FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects, House for a Photographer is a live/work space that joins a photographer’s studio with residence.

Situated on a road that runs through the countryside of the Shiga prefecture in Japan, the construction is placed directly opposite the village shrine. At front-facing street view, there are no windows, but a minimal exterior of mortar and galvanized steel sheeting, which reflects dull light.

Inside, the house is filled with plays on light and shadow. A courtyard brings a surplus of natural light and connects the spaces, allowing for an indoor/outdoor mood that connects the house with nature. Wood finishing warms the more private areas, and instead of segmenting the space to rooms with specific function, it was designed to be dynamic and accommodate how the resident lives, rather than follow the traditional tenets of residential structure. A place to not only make work, but display, the home features a full gallery, and the light-filled convertible living area also functions as a photo studio.

More at: FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects
Photos: Yoshihiro Asada, Norihito Yamauchi

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

At the left bank of Lake Geneva, Corsier is the idyllic Swiss location of this holiday villa that introduces an updated aesthetic to the traditional architecture of the area. Designed by Nyon-based Bunq Architectes, the structure fills an already developed residential space by placement in the garden area next to an existing villa.

The house’s exterior is clad in a facade of boards that have been treated in the Japanese shou sugi ban method of charring, which results in weather and rot-proof wood that is free of chemicals or superfluous decoration. The exterior is designed in a manner that allows the facade to fold open at the placement of glass doors and panels, maximizing the indoor/outdoor architectural layout.

The house’s rooms are positioned to open to and make ideal use of the outdoor space, and thoughtful landscape-style windows and large glass panels flood the space with light. Built-in storage and an integrated, curved staircase seamlessly fit into the clean white and wood-finished interior.

More at: Bunq Architectes
Photos: David Gagnebin de Bons

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

At 1,066 meters above sea level, the Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus, sits at the base of Hardangervidda – a large mountain plateau in central-southern Norway. The residence was designed by the architect for his own family, and is built into the landscape to avoid a strong contrast between new construction and the natural environment.

Since there is no road connection, building materials had to be flown in by helicopter or delivered via snow vehicle. The exterior is clad in pine, which will grey over time, further blending into the existing landscape. Designed to be used year-round, considerations had to be taken to protect the cabin from the harsh winter climate of Norway, specifically, exterior build features like the roof’s width, protect the house, and trafficked areas were specially placed to avoid snow accumulation. The house sits on a foundation of concrete pillars above the bedrock, and the immediate area was landscaped subtly to preserve the slow-growing alpine vegetation found at such altitudes.

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Oslo-based Aarhus’ minimal approach to the interior also makes use of pine throughout. The main area consists of a angled ceiling and a view-facing wall of glass, the space designed to suggest you are as outdoors as you are in, a reference to the gapahuk (the Norwegian version of a lean-to – a traditional, improvised hiking shelter).

With surprisingly sizable accommodations (thanks to built-in bunks), clever storage, and thoughtfully positioned windows, the Ustaoset Cabin offers all the comforts of home while taking full advantage of the great outdoors.

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

More at: Jon Danielsen Aarhus
Photos: Knut Bry, Jon Danielsen Aarhus, Ruth Mjøen

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

KDVA Architects conceived the FH1 House as a “modern fisherman’s house;” built into the rocky landscape, adjacent to a Norwegian fjord, the liberal use of concrete and brutalist suggestions integrate the structure to the land. At under 1000 sq ft, the home perfectly balances minimalism and elegance, without forgoing a strong Nordic identity.

Full-wall moveable glass panels fill the space with natural light, as well as bridge the outside to in with remarkable views of the surrounding landscape. A central living space is adaptable to layout preferences, and a stark, wraparound veranda serves as an outdoor extension of the home.

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

 

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

More at: KDVA
Photos: KDVA

House in Mikage by Sides Core

House in Mikage by Sides Core

Osaka-based architecture and design studio Sides Core designed this straightforward, adaptable house in Mikage, a residential area on the outskirts of Kobe, Japan.

The two level, timber-framed house sits on a raised plot, making for a parking space in front, privacy from the street, and direct landscape views to the south. From the outside, two wood-lined square openings hint at the layout: one being a sheltered balcony on the upper level, where two bedrooms and a bathroom are placed, and on the ground floor, a terrace that connects to an open-configuration living, kitchen, and dining space. The architects conceived the dwelling as a series of “containers,” making for a flexible arrangement as the family’s needs change over time.

“Simple containers made of quality materials are the easiest to use,” said the architects. “You don’t grow tired of them, and they bring out the best in whatever is inside.”

House in Mikage by Sides Core

House in Mikage by Sides Core

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Gold & Gray Apartment by Richard Lindvall

Gold & Gray Apartment by Richard Lindvall

Stockholm-based designer Richard Lindvall is responsible for this transformation of an old embassy space into a modernized, private apartment.

Originally consisting of a 3-walled layout, this floorpan was reconfigured as one large, just-under 1000 sq ft space. The loft-like main space includes the kitchen, dining, and living areas, all tied together through a simple material palette of concrete, muted parquet flooring, and wood fiber paneling. As a compliment to this restrained color story, three oversized brass units serve as a kitchen island, closet, and even a coffee table. 

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Gold & Gray Apartment by Richard Lindvall

Gold & Gray Apartment by Richard Lindvall

The two bathrooms are concrete-floored and have walls of blasted limestone from the island of Gotland, one includes a massive (albeit minimal) concrete bathtub, built to accommodate an entire family of five.

Gold & Gray Apartment by Richard Lindvall

Gold & Gray Apartment by Richard Lindvall

Richard Lindvall is a multi-platform designer, but works principally in interior design and concept direction. In addition to interior layout, he designs furniture and the finishings that complete his thoughtfully-approached, functional spaces.

More at: Richard Lindvall
Photos: Mikael Axelsson

Journey by Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

At the base of the Renzo Piano designed Maison Hermès in the heart of the Ginza district of Tokyo, botanist and cactus enthusiast Kohei Oda has developed a new landscape for the presentation of Hermès’ finery. The installation, “Journey,” which runs through September 26, features Oda’s unusual and astonishing plant life serving as an artful backdrop for pieces from the Hermès collection. The masterful arrangment offers a natural contrast and an unexpected air of relativity to the Hermès selections; in the larger displays, a multitude of textural cacti of varying height create an otherworldly scene, and in the smaller windows, dried plant forms interact and are entangled with the house’s accessories.

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

A favorite of The Aesthetic Post, Hiroshima-based Kohei Oda has revolutionized the “face” of cacti. From his world-renowned shop, Qusamura, to international installations, Oda’s work encourages us to reconsider plant life; by presenting cacti in unexpected ways, Oda surely engages the eye, but his horticultural experiments, including those with grafting (transplanting pieces of one plant to grow on another), move into the territory of sculpture and the extraordinary natural possibilities associated. 

Maison Hermès is not only a shopping space, but a structure that houses workshops and offices, exhibition areas, and multimedia quarters, as well as a roof garden and a courtyard with direct access to the Tokyo subway. Its cladding, composed of more than 13,000 glass blocks, developed by acclaimed architect and engineer Renzo Piano, makes for a true architectural destination. The display windows at the base of Maison Hermès are the perfect stage for artists to reexamine “window dressing.”

More at: Maison Hermès, Qusamura
Photos: Hermès

Les Enfants Rouges Apartment by Ubalt Architects

Les Enfants Rouges by Ubalt Architects

Les Enfants Rouges by Ubalt Architects

Les Enfants Rouges by Ubalt Architects

Les Enfants Rouges by Ubalt Architects

Les Enfants Rouges by Ubalt Architects

Les Enfants Rouges by Ubalt Architects

In a typical 17th-century flat of the Marais in Paris, architecture and interiors firm Ubalt have completed the project Les Enfants Rouges (a reference to the nearby historic market). The less than 400 sq ft space is designed to appear longer and more spacious, blocking a bath and kitchen at one end, and a bedroom opposite, with a space arranged as a dining area, lounge, and office in between. The careful use of space and line-based placement, as well as thoughtful, polished finishing, successfully combines functionality and modernity while preserving the historic character of the building.

Specialized design choices, such as accordion partitions that do not reach the ceiling, separate the spaces, maintaining a feeling of openness and allowing the original beamed ceiling to be continuously exposed. Storage, imperative in a small space like this, is situated on the traverse of the apartment’s length; the custom-made furniture pieces are space-specific, and lend aesthetic continuity to the apartment, as well as visual effect with their mirrored bases (topped in marble). An all-white paint job highlights the textures and material applications throughout, including the beams and flooring, and suspended, industrial-inspired lighting runs lengthwise, opposite the ceiling beams. 

Ubalt is a Parisian design agency founded in 2015 by National Institute of Architecture (Versailles) graduates Nastasia Potel and Mylène Vasse.

More at: Ubalt

Life House by John Pawson / Living Architecture

Life House by John Pawson

Life House by John Pawson

Life House by John Pawson

Amidst the rolling hills of the Welsh countryside, Living Architecture commissioned architect John Pawson to create a house of serenity and beauty – Life House (or Tŷ Bywyd, as it is called in Welsh). The house serves as a retreat that can sleep up to six people, with the architectural and design intention of contemplation and restoration for its guests.

John Pawson is a master of working within the parameters of landscape, ecology, and historic importance; his portfolio is filled with minimalist homes, boutiques, and even religious spaces. Working in collaboration with philosopher and writer, as well as the founder of Living Architecture, Alain de Botton, Pawson’s approach to Life House was an uncompromisingly modern design where it would be possible to inhabit a different sort of architectural space. Luxurious in its carefully executed simplicity, the house has been influenced by Japanese design, as well as the architecture of Benedictine monks. To further inspire mental awareness and tranquility, a sequence of walks have been curated the artist Hamish Fulton.

“In this house I wanted to create a modern, secular retreat, where guests can experience the benefits of introspection, solitude, and immersion in nature,” said Pawson.

Life House by John Pawson

Life House by John Pawson

Life House by John Pawson

From the handmade Danish bricks (black on the exterior, pale grey inside), to the polished terrazzo floor, and Douglas-fir ceilings, the house’s materials and finishes were chosen for their calming and clean nature.

Life House’s floorpan is organized around two corridors that meet at a right angle: one “dark,” leading to a chamber built into the hillside, a cavernous space designed for contemplation, the other, “light,” leads to an outdoor space where the exercise of purifying the mind is also encouraged. A combined kitchen, dining area, and lounge serve as the central hub, with a layout to satisfy both complete privacy, and when it is desired, sociability and communion.

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