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Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

From contemporary architects such as David Chipperfield and Tadao Ando, to twentieth-century masters including Marcel Breuer and Le Corbusier, Phaidon’s Atlas of Brutalist Architecture is a geographically-organized collection of nearly 900 brutalist buildings, a number of which are no longer standing. Presented in an oversized format, the book contains 1000 duotone photographs documenting the “graphic strength, emotional power, and compelling architectural presence” of the oft-polarizing Brutalist style, across over 100 countries. Including a brief on each building’s history and design intention, the structure’s condition, use, and status is also identified through the use of a clever atlas-style key.

More at Phaidon.

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Designed to provide accommodation for participants in the annual International Garden Festival, and when not in season, to be used by architecture students from the Université Laval, Résidence des Stagiaires by Quebec City-based Atelier Pierre Thibault is a minimalist, double-structured guest house on the 45-acre nature preserve, Jardins de Métis, along the Saint Lawrence Seaway in rural Quebec.

The residence consists of two gabled buildings, connected by an outdoor terrace, but separated by function. The main structure contains the communal kitchen, dining, and living areas, with a mezzanine study, thoughtfully floored with open slats, allowing light to travel throughout the space. The utilitarian, exposed-wood interiors reflect the organic nature of the buildings’ exterior, with knotty and natural finish wood planks making up the floors, walls, and even furniture, all executed by local woodworker Gervais Pineau.

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

In the sleeping building, with bunks on the first floor, and additional beds tucked into the roof’s eaves, glass doors and windows offer perfectly framed views of the surrounding nature. 

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

The estate at Jardins de Métis opened to the public in 1962, the main residence converted to a museum. It hosts The International Garden Festival, an event started in 2000, which involves architects and designers creating temporary structures and installations amongst the lush natural surroundings.

More at: Atelier Pierre Thibault
Photos: Maxime Brouillet and Laurence Gaudette

Courtyard at Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

As part of a renovation of the Yamaguchi Sake Brewery in Kurume, Japan, firm CASE-REAL took an organic approach to connecting existing structures with a minimalist courtyard. Creating a meditative space in clean finishes, with the installation of cement floors and stairs, and re-imagining the large lounge space, result in a more fluid connection between the architecture that represents the brewery’s history. The traditional Japanese property was built in the early 1800s; paired with a modern approach, the spaces are elevated, but still reflective of the traditional methods employed in the rice-milling and brewing process.

More at: CASE-REAL
Photos:  Hiroshi Mizusaki

House in Nakauchi by SNARK

House in Nakauchi by SNARK

House in Nakauchi by SNARK

House in Nakauchi by SNARK

House in Nakauchi by SNARK

House in Nakauchi by SNARK

House in Nakauchi by SNARK

House in Nakauchi by SNARK

House in Nakauchi by SNARK

Japanese architecture firm SNARK designed this minimal home in Maebashi, a city located in the northern Kantō region of Japan. Utilizing a creative composition of materials to strike a balance between indoor and out, a semi-transparent volume extends from the main residence, providing natural light and additional spaces to the structure; sliding glazed partitions allow for flow between the rooms. An angled roof allows for loft-like platform space for sleep or storage, accessible via metal ladders, and wooden built-in storage and shelving pieces are incorporated to the interior architecture.

More at: SNARK
Photos: Ippei Shinzawa

Sushi Isono (Sapporo) by Jun Igarashi Architects

Sushi Isono by Jun Igarashi Architects

Sushi Isono by Jun Igarashi Architects

Sushi Isono by Jun Igarashi Architects

Sushi Isono by Jun Igarashi Architects

Designed by Japanese firm Jun Igarashi Architects, Sushi Isono is an quietly elegant restaurant located in the Odori Park neighborhood of Sapporo, Japan.

The restaurant is arranged into multiple spaces, each offering a special ambiance, from private dining areas, to counter seats perfect for engaging with the chef. Thoughtfully placed arches and architectural features allow for harmony and flow throughout the interior, while maintaining privacy for patrons. Heavy use of light wood paneling, accompanied by minimal decoration and a contrast of wood and concrete flooring, make for the perfect, non-flashy palette to present Isono Naohiro’s highly-regarded cuisine.

More at: Jun Igarashi Architects
Photos: Jun Igarashi Architects

Vipp Loft

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp Loft, Copenhagen

Vipp, the Danish company most known for their metal pedal bin, introduced in 1939, continues to reach into multiple facets of design, this time with their self-service concept hotel. Rather than a multi-room complex, the Vipp hotel consists of single spaces in multiple locations. Their first, the Vipp shelter, a prefab the company debuted a couple of years ago, is now available nightly, and sits in the Swedish wilderness. Most recently, the brand opened the doors to Vipp loft, a 400-square-meter space atop an old printing factory in Copenhagen, that also houses the Vipp office. Conceptualized by Studio David Thulstrup, the loft frames the brand’s design philosophy, and offers all the comforts of a home, including a fully outfitted Vipp kitchen and dining area, three outdoor terraces, and fireplace. Vipp’s “rooms” have a stocked fridge, bath products by Aèsop, bedding by Aiayu, and the brand’s own organic cotton towels. Vipp plans to add more “rooms” to the hotel line, including Chimney House, a landmark building that was once a water pumping station near the harbor of northern Copenhagen.

More at: Vipp

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

Designed by Kusatsu-based FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects, House for a Photographer is a live/work space that joins a photographer’s studio with residence.

Situated on a road that runs through the countryside of the Shiga prefecture in Japan, the construction is placed directly opposite the village shrine. At front-facing street view, there are no windows, but a minimal exterior of mortar and galvanized steel sheeting, which reflects dull light.

Inside, the house is filled with plays on light and shadow. A courtyard brings a surplus of natural light and connects the spaces, allowing for an indoor/outdoor mood that connects the house with nature. Wood finishing warms the more private areas, and instead of segmenting the space to rooms with specific function, it was designed to be dynamic and accommodate how the resident lives, rather than follow the traditional tenets of residential structure. A place to not only make work, but display, the home features a full gallery, and the light-filled convertible living area also functions as a photo studio.

More at: FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects
Photos: Yoshihiro Asada, Norihito Yamauchi

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

At the left bank of Lake Geneva, Corsier is the idyllic Swiss location of this holiday villa that introduces an updated aesthetic to the traditional architecture of the area. Designed by Nyon-based Bunq Architectes, the structure fills an already developed residential space by placement in the garden area next to an existing villa.

The house’s exterior is clad in a facade of boards that have been treated in the Japanese shou sugi ban method of charring, which results in weather and rot-proof wood that is free of chemicals or superfluous decoration. The exterior is designed in a manner that allows the facade to fold open at the placement of glass doors and panels, maximizing the indoor/outdoor architectural layout.

The house’s rooms are positioned to open to and make ideal use of the outdoor space, and thoughtful landscape-style windows and large glass panels flood the space with light. Built-in storage and an integrated, curved staircase seamlessly fit into the clean white and wood-finished interior.

More at: Bunq Architectes
Photos: David Gagnebin de Bons

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

At 1,066 meters above sea level, the Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus, sits at the base of Hardangervidda – a large mountain plateau in central-southern Norway. The residence was designed by the architect for his own family, and is built into the landscape to avoid a strong contrast between new construction and the natural environment.

Since there is no road connection, building materials had to be flown in by helicopter or delivered via snow vehicle. The exterior is clad in pine, which will grey over time, further blending into the existing landscape. Designed to be used year-round, considerations had to be taken to protect the cabin from the harsh winter climate of Norway, specifically, exterior build features like the roof’s width, protect the house, and trafficked areas were specially placed to avoid snow accumulation. The house sits on a foundation of concrete pillars above the bedrock, and the immediate area was landscaped subtly to preserve the slow-growing alpine vegetation found at such altitudes.

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Oslo-based Aarhus’ minimal approach to the interior also makes use of pine throughout. The main area consists of a angled ceiling and a view-facing wall of glass, the space designed to suggest you are as outdoors as you are in, a reference to the gapahuk (the Norwegian version of a lean-to – a traditional, improvised hiking shelter).

With surprisingly sizable accommodations (thanks to built-in bunks), clever storage, and thoughtfully positioned windows, the Ustaoset Cabin offers all the comforts of home while taking full advantage of the great outdoors.

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

More at: Jon Danielsen Aarhus
Photos: Knut Bry, Jon Danielsen Aarhus, Ruth Mjøen

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

KDVA Architects conceived the FH1 House as a “modern fisherman’s house;” built into the rocky landscape, adjacent to a Norwegian fjord, the liberal use of concrete and brutalist suggestions integrate the structure to the land. At under 1000 sq ft, the home perfectly balances minimalism and elegance, without forgoing a strong Nordic identity.

Full-wall moveable glass panels fill the space with natural light, as well as bridge the outside to in with remarkable views of the surrounding landscape. A central living space is adaptable to layout preferences, and a stark, wraparound veranda serves as an outdoor extension of the home.

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

 

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

FH1 House by KDVA

More at: KDVA
Photos: KDVA









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