ARCHITECTURE Archives - Page 2 of 4 - Aesthetic Post


You are currently browsing the archives for the ARCHITECTURE category.

Casa Voltes by Ferguson Bates Architects and Liebman Villavecchia

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

Casa Voltes

In the seaside Catalonian village of Cadaqués, on the site of  a ruined historic dwelling, sits Casa Voltes, a collaborative project between Ferguson Bates Architects and Liebman Villavecchia of Barcelona.

The former fishing village that was, for centuries, cut off from the mainland, has a distinct architectural style; adapting new buildings to the surrounding village context and unique geography requires an extremely fine hand, with an understanding of Cadaqués’ identity.

A storied history, that includes artists and writers such as such as Picasso, García Lorca, Dalí, Duchamp, John Cage and Richard Hamilton, amongst others, is woven with both tradition and twentieth-century influence. Many cultural, as well as architectural contributions, were made to Cadaqués’ footprint during this time; as noted by Oriol Bohigas, architects such as Federico Correa, Alfonso Milá and Coderch, Harnden (American) and Bombelli (Italian), “wisely set the tone of the ’60s in Cadaqués by providing the models to develop a current of stylistic discretion” and “succeeded in understanding the geographical and social reality of the town.”

This philosophy applies to Casa Voltes; carefully working inside the parameters of village architecture, geography, and respect of the former building, the house is graceful and modern, without any sense of historic recreation.

Continue reading →

Piece in Brief: Alvar Aalto Tea Trolley 901

Aalvo Tea Trolley 901

Aalvo Tea Trolley 901

Designed by Finnish designer Alvar Aalto in 1936, the Tea Trolley 901 is a decidedly modern take on a traditional piece of furniture; a nod to British tea culture, perfectly balanced with Japanese carpentry and architecture, at home as a tea or coffee cart, but also a distinctive bar or side table. With a bentwood frame of blonde birch, and a tabletop and lower shelf finished in linoleum, the trolley is designed with functionality in mind; a handle that spans the width of the trolley, as well as rubber-treaded wheels, allow it to be moved gracefully.

Aalto’s cart designs were first introduced at the 1936 Milan Triennale, and later at Paris’ world’s fair in 1937. The design is still produced by Artek (now owned by Vitra), a Finnish company that was originally founded in 1935 by Aalto and his wife Aino, art promoter Maire Gullichsen, and art historian Nils-Gustav Hahl.

Alvar Aalto on The Aesthetic PostAalvo’s work on display at the Triennale di Milano, 1936.

Aalvo Tea Trolley 901Aalto at his home in Helsinki.

A world-class architect, and one of the faces of the International Modernism movement, it was Aalto who originally employed the process of bending thick layers of birch into smooth, chic curves to frame furniture, perhaps best noted in his stackable Stool 60, an icon of functionalist design.

Aalto’s work greatly influenced midcentury designers such as Eero Saarinen and Charles & Ray Eames. His style, which incorporated nature to architectural form, became known as Humanist Modernism, and his design philosophy, Gesamtkunstwerk (“a total work of art”) became his trademark, whereby he and his wife Aino, would design everything from the building, to the furnishings, lighting, even intimate details like glassware, inside.

As a final note, last year, Dutch designer Hella Jongerius designed an updated version of the 901 for Artek’s reintroduction of some of their archive’s most iconic pieces. In her interpretation, the frame’s color is the same as the shelf and tabletop, in light birch or black lacquer (see below).

Aalvo Tea Trolley 901

More at: Artek
Photos: Artek

Tuve Hotel by Design Systems

Tuve Hotel by Design Systems

Tuve Hotel by Design Systems

Intended to be an escape from the bustle and chaos of Hong Kong, a discreet, signless entrance in the Tin Hau district guides you into a quiet experience, Tuve, by architecture firm Design Systems.

Inspired by photographer Kim Høltermand’s panoramas of Sweden’s Lake Tuve, the owner wanted to incorporate the mood of Scandinavian landscape to the 66-room boutique hotel. Design Systems thoughtfully translated the atmospheric, cold images to the space, making the best of natural, often common materials. As described by the firm: “We feel that the term luxury has much been vulgarized nowadays, rather, we prefer the term refinement. Refinement goes beyond the surface.”

Avoiding the cliches of exotic, over-the-top elements, Tuve keeps it simple and engages the visitors emotions. Materials such as concrete, galvanized steel, brass, and oak are familiar, but used appropriately and elegantly. Creative use of lighting throughout the spaces, both artificial and natural, reveals texture, casts shadows, and establishes a specific ambiance.

Tuve Hotel by Design Systems

Tuve Hotel by Design Systems

Tuve Hotel by Design Systems

Tuve Hotel by Design Systems

As the spaces are used, hidden craftsmanship is revealed, quietly interacting with the minimalist environment. From the pale wooden box that opens to a desk and minibar, to the door that folds from the side of the cabinet to store tea-making equipment. Stools are made from roughly hewn marble, and brass switch plates are left to oxidize, exposing the true nature of the material.

By sticking to the basics, and executing this with the ultimate finesse, Tuve sets itself apart in a way that challenges the typical hotel experience.

More at: Tuve
Photos: Matteo Carcelli, Design Systems.

Gaudin House by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Built in 1878, this structure in Anzère, Switzerland was originally intended as a barn to shelter animals and their keepers during the alpine grazing season. Decades later, under the hand of architecture firm Savioz Fabrizzi, the barn has been converted for modern comfort.

Gaudin House by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Gaudin House by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Gaudin House by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Gaudin House by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

With the stone walls restored, a panoramic window added to the front, and a subtle raise of the roof (of about a foot), the exterior remains rudimentary in appearance. The stonework was so skillfully fortified, that it is hard to tell where the original stone ends and the new begins.

Gaudin House by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Gaudin House by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

As a counterpoint to the rough stone exterior, made to resist the tough alpine climate, the interior is finished with smooth larch boards. This elegant, albeit simple finishing also provides a visual warmth to balance the expansive view of snow-covered mountains offered by the panoramic window, an excellent source of light to the space.

Gaudin House by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Gaudin House by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Inside, the upper floor houses the main living space, kitchen, and bathroom, while the lower level, dug into the mountainside, splits the bedroom and a utility space.

With an emphasis on comfort and thoughtful layout, this reinvention of a rudimentary structure offers new life to an old space, without introducing a new footprint.

More at: Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes
Photos: Thomas Jantscher

Villa Mörtnäs by Fourfoursixsix Architects

Located in the Stockholm Archipelago, this private home by firm Fourfoursixsix, commissioned by Swedish developer Strömma Projekt, may appear discreet from the outside with its clean, aerated concrete exterior, but has been thoughtfully designed to best take advantage of both natural light and the home’s remarkable placement in the landscape.

Villa Mörtnäs

Villa Mörtnäs

Villa Mörtnäs

Specialized features such as large-format windows and extended-height ceilings exaggerate the scale of the upstairs living space from front-to-back, where a wall of sliding-glass doors extend to a south-facing terrace that meets a natural rock face.

Villa Mörtnäs

Villa Mörtnäs

Villa Mörtnäs

Villa Mörtnäs

In a simple arrangement, the bedrooms sit on the house’s lower level.

Villa Mörtnäs

Villa Mörtnäs

Whitened pine floors and clean angles make for a straightforward interior that doesn’t distract from the outside views via the artfully-placed windows.

More at: Fourfoursixsix
Photos: Wrede, Johan Dehlin

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

When friends pooled their money to buy a plot of land on a remote estuary in northern New Zealand, they eventually decided to build dual cabins. A thoughtful approach the vacation home, the buildings mirror each other on the outside, but have distinct personalities inside.

Designed by firm principal Nat Cheshire of Aukland-based Cheshire Architects, the cabins are entirely off-the-grid. Being only 312 square feet, both manage to accommodate a living area, kitchen, bathroom, and sleeping loft.

Charred wood exteriors and very little footprint (no driveway or yard) make for a striking placement, as Cheshire describes: “In that big long grass, it feels more like these were boats tied up at moorings in a slow-motion ocean.”

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Each unit has two side openings: one as an entrance and the other a window. There are no traditional doors, instead, a boulder acts as a step to enter one of the cabins, the other with a small fold-down deck.

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Both cabins have a functional (albeit compact) kitchen with a sink, refrigerator, gas stove, and even a dishwasher drawer, luxuries you might not expect for such a small space. Keeping the bathroom closet-sized, with the assistance of an outdoor shower, lends real estate to the rest of the space.

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Eyrie Houses by Cheshire Architects

Interior design-wise, specific materials were chosen to set the cabins apart: one being light, the other dark. In the light cabin, the interior walls are unfinished plywood, the kitchen nook lined in oiled eucalyptus. Furniture selections include an Ercol sofa and Arne Jacobsen floor lamp. In the dark cabin, the interior is finished in black polished panels, which have a deep sheen at night, the kitchen nook in rich brass.

More at: Cheshire Architects
Photos: Jeremy Toth, Darryl Ward

Public Natures: Evolutionary Infrastructures

Public Natures: Evolutionary Infrastructures

publicnatures2

Public Natures: Evolutionary Infrastructures

Public Natures: Evolutionary Infrastructures is a hybrid manifesto/monograph from New York City-based firm Weiss/Manfredi; this collection of essays, roundtable discussions, and selected projects by the firm helps to identify new terms and models for architecture’s evolution in the field of landscape and urban territory. The functionally designed urban life is thoughtfully organized in the book, which features case studies such as the Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, as well as contributions by academics and theorists such as Kenneth Frampton, Preston Scott Cohen, Felipe Correa, Keller Easterling, Paul Lewis, Hashim Sarkis, and Nader Tehrani; with a foreword by Barry Bergdoll.

Public Natures was designed in collaboration with studio Project Projects, and the format was developed to balance photographs and drawings alongside reader-friendly text and detail points. A beautifully offset-printed bookcloth cover is enlivened by a bold green book block, and inside, contrasting paper stocks articulate the shift between the theoretical and case study sections.

More at: Princeton Architectural Press
Photos: Project Projects

CD Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

CB Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

CB Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

marcmerckxph1

CB Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

CB Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

CB Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

CB Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

CD Poolhouse is the work of Belgian designer and architect Marc Merckx. The elegant, simple architecture is dark and spare, but still airy, reflecting Merckx’s design philosophy: “a constant search for the perfect balance between proportions, materials, and space.” With a black timber facade, the building extends to the pool via a black steel pergola. Inside, Merckx’s custom furniture designs, natural materials, and a minimal color palette connect the indoors to out.

Photography via Marc Merckx
More at: Marc Merckx

The Swimming Pools of Alberto Campo Baeza

While the weather is scorching hot in New York City, it is a great time to daydream about the perfect open air swimming pool. I’m not talking about the cloyingly chlorinated rooftop “member’s only” vats that seem to be city crossroads of vulgarians, but instead the thoughtfully placed, elegant pool that is at peace with its environment, and is as inviting as it is a compliment to architecture or landscape.

Spanish architect Alberto Campo Baeza is a genius of sorts when it comes to pools, their proportion to structure, and involving them in the poetry of space. Here are five striking designs from Estudio Campo Baeza that beautifully incorporate the swimming pool.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza
House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza
House of the Infinite (2014), Cádiz, photos by Javier Callejas

 

Rufo House by Alberto Campo Baeza

Rufo House (2009), Toledo, photo by Javier Callejas

 

Gaspar House by Alberto Campo Baeza

Gaspar House, Cádiz (1992), photo by Hisao Suzuki

 

De Blas House by Alberto Campo Baeza

De Blas House, Madrid (2000), photo by Hisao Suzuki

 

Casa Guerrero by Alberto Campo Baeza

Guerrero House, Cádiz (2005), photo by Roland Halbe

 

More at: Alberto Campo Baeza

Fayland House by David Chipperfield Architects

Fayland House by David Chipperfield Architects

Fayland House by David Chipperfield Architects

In the Chiltern Hills of England stands the Fayland House, a single-storey, landscape-aware residence designed by renowned British architect David Chipperfield. The Fayland house was recently awarded “Best New House” by the UK’s Architectural Review.

The building was conceived as a “large earthwork,” dug into the sloping ground of the heavily wooded, chalk-grounded Chiltern Hills. The walls, columns, and plinth were constructed from custom-made white brick, set into a lime mortar that was applied then sponged to leave a thin residue, resulting in a color that would be similar to the chalk beneath the house. The colonnade is fronted by 11 broad columns, extending the length of the facade and sheltering the outdoor space that is connected to several of the house’s rooms.

Fayland House by David Chipperfield Architects

Fayland House by David Chipperfield Architects

To negotiate the ground’s changing levels, the structure is built on an ample plinth, which the studio compares to a “dam sitting on the sups of the slope.” “On one hand the house appears as a natural escarpment in the landscape, while on the other it affirms itself as a man-made structure expressed by the robust brick columns placed in front.” 

Fayland House by David Chipperfield Architects

Fayland House by David Chipperfield Architects

Behind the walls, four open air courtyards are concealed, and it is through the largest courtyard on one end that the main entrance is formed.

Fayland House by David Chipperfield Architects

Fayland House by David Chipperfield Architects

Fayland House by David Chipperfield Architects

Fayland House by David Chipperfield Architects

Fayland House by David Chipperfield Architects

Inside the house, the brick walls have been left exposed, beautifully conversing with a bare concrete soffit and polished terrazzo floors. With one sprawling level, the house’s main areas are arranged to best utilize the front-facing design, as well as the inner courtyards, with a guest area at its own end of the building.

More at: David Chipperfield Architects
Photos: Simon Menges









© 2017, Aesthetic Post