ART Archives - Page 2 of 8 - Aesthetic Post


You are currently browsing the archives for the ART category.

Tool Roots by Mike Abelson at Maison Hermès

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Postalco co-founder and designer Mike Abelson is the latest to oversee the window design at Hermès’ Ginza store in Tokyo. The display, titled Tool Roots, features a variety of tools and work objects arranged and broken down by their primary elements; Tool Roots is Ableson’s response to the Hermès 2017 theme of “Object Sense,” with 3-dimensional charts of daily objects mixed with drawings. The presentation is interwoven with Hermès products, and spans across two large display cases, as well as smaller feature boxes.

“Maybe tools are like colors? Perhaps they can be blended together, the way colors are, to form new objects with completely different roles?” says Abelson.

Tool Roots runs through July 11, 2017.

More at: Maison Hermès, Postalco
Photos: Mike Abelson

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape by Diane Tuft

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

Photographed by acclaimed environmental fine art photographer Diane Tuft, The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape (published by Assouline) is a collection of images illustrating the alarming melt of the Arctic Circle. Tuft’s work is a direct look at climate change’s radical effect on a once pristine frozen landscape, now both haunting and unavoidably beautiful, from the North Pole, to mountain glaciers of Svalbard, Norway (an archipelago located 600 miles north of Norway’s northernmost point, where mountain glaciers would be undisturbed by humans), to the awe-inspiring icebergs and ice sheet of Greenland.

By the end of this century, it is predicted that the ocean will rise eight feet, causing the displacement of millions of people throughout the Earth. Ocean rise will be due to three factors: the melting of mountain glaciers, the thermal expansion of the ocean, and the melting of the Greenland ice sheet. Tuft’s visual record of this ruinous environment serves as a reminder to respect and understand the science of our ever-changing planet.

Diane Tuft specializes in infrared and ultraviolet photography, creating striking images that record what the naked eye cannot always see. Her travels to destinations where ultraviolet light is in excess result in otherworldly, vivid colors that are made possible by the surplus of this light, but also directly reflect the serious environmental imbalance.

More at: Assouline, Diane Tuft

“Beauty is whatever anyone thinks is beautiful.”

– Rei Kawakubo, founder of Comme de Garçons, who is being honored at The Met Costume Institute’s exhibition Rei Kawakubo/Comme de Garçons: Art of the In-Between, May 4 – September 4.

Forms in Space… by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans

Forms in Space... by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans

Forms in Space... by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans

Forms in Space... by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans

Cerith Wyn Evans’ installation, Forms in Space… by Light (in Time), at the Tate Britain’s Duveen Galleries, is an exploration of form and perspective via more than a mile of neon lighting; strict lines and graphic shapes of light are suspended from the ceiling, referencing physical and kinetic gestures.

At first glance, the almost chaotic nature of the installation is similar in visual style to “light writing,” a popular trend in art photography, however, as the viewer moves along the installation and perspective shifts, the uniform arrangement appears to be in motion. Structured in three parts that emerge from a single neon ring and develop into three disc forms, Wyn Evan’s implemented choreology – the practice of translating movement into notational form, and was influenced by the precise work of Japanese Noh theater, a gesture-based, highly-crafted performance art. The artist describes the three forms as “occulist witnesses,” a reference to artist Marcel Duchamp’s sculpture The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), which was donated to the Tate’s collection in 1975.

Best known for his use of neon lighting, the work of Welsh conceptual artist Cerith Wyn Evans ranges from experimental film, to installation, sculpture, photography, and text. Other light installations by Wyn Evans include E=V=E=N=T (2015), a sculpture commissioned for Malmo Live, and Arr/Dep (imaginary landscape for the birds) (2006), at Lufthansa’s Frankfurt headquarters.

Forms in Space… by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans runs until August, 20 at Tate Britain, London.

More at: Tate Britain
Photos: Joe Humphreys © Tate

Visible Distance / Second Sight by Jennifer Bolande

Visible Distance / Second Sight by Jennifer Bolande

As part of Desert X, the exhibition of site-specific works by various artists (from which you’ve probably seen images of the very popular Mirage, the mirror-covered house by Doug Aitken) in the Coachella Valley of California, Jennifer Bolande’s contribution Visible Distance / Second Sight, is a clever commentary on advertising and distraction. A series of standard, full-size billboards along the Gene Autry Trail, meant to be experienced from a moving car, feature photographs of the surrounding mountains, positioned in a way that at approach, can appear to align with the natural horizon. The Visible Distance / Second Sight series references the advertising technique referred to as “Burma-Shave,” named after the shaving company of the same name that used sequential placement of signs to create messaging intended to be read from a moving vehicle. If you’ve traveled this route near Palm Springs, you are familiar with the very-present billboard advertising, which can easily distract from the scenery in which it is placed, Bolande uses this opportunity to point to the striking landscape itself. 

(Desert X runs through April 30, 2017.)

More at: Desert X
Photos: Lance Gerber

As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon & Tschiember

 As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon and Tschiember

 As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon and Tschiember

 As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon and Tschiember

 As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon and Tschiember

In the picturesque, serene Swiss Alps, Douglas Gordon and Morgane Tschiember’s As close as you can for as long as it lasts is a temporary art installation produced for the biennial event Elevation 1049, supported by the LUMA Foundation. Using fire, smoke, and sound, the piece is a call-and-response between two artists, a vague allusion to the regional tradition of yodeling. Tschiember’s circular fire works with Gordon’s installed sound piece, which is based on our primal fears of unforeseen animals and the dark, under the narrative of a lonely traveler being lured through the woods surrounding Gstaad, by the reassuring smoke and warm fire, as well as the potential of companionship in this setting.

As close as you can for as long as it lasts is on view as a part of Elevation 1049 through March 19, 2017.

More at: Elevation 1049
Photos:  Stefan Altenburger

UV by TJOKEEFE

UV by TJOKEEFE

UV by TJOKEEFE

UV by TJOKEEFE

UV by TJOKEEFE  

UV by TJOKEEFE is a light sculpture composed of ultraviolet LEDs, a powder-coated aluminum bar, and woven nylon thread. The piece is designed to be suspended by its thread flat on the wall, or in a corner; the thread reacts to the UV light projected from below, becoming its own light source, emitting a soft orange glow.

TJOKEEFE, the studio of Michigan-born designer TJ O’Keefe, was established in 2010. With a mission of exploring design and creating powerful objects through compelling minimalism, TJOKEEFE has produced furniture and objects guided by geometry and graphic presence.

More at: TJOKEEFE

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Light is essential to maintain life, the strongest and fastest form of energy; this common, yet mysterious phenomenon has captivated creative thinkers for millenia. As the third volume in their Atlas of Creative Thinking, PARS, the arts and sciences organization led by art historian Hester Aardse and poet Astrid Alben, Findings on Light (designed by Joost Grootens) invites more than fifty artists and scientists to discuss the specific, albeit broad topic of light.

A collection of research and artworks, ranging from humorous, to beautiful and complex, even disturbing, Findings on Light brings new reflection and vision to the compelling subject. “We stipulate only two formal requirements,” PARS says. “Each response, whether it be a note jotted down on a beer mat, a formula, a dialogue, an essay, poem, sketch, a piece of sculpture or a piece of string, has to be in the language of the author’s discipline and relate to the subject.” Consequently, the outcomes are as diverse as their authors and creators.

Based on the idea that creativity and curiosity are fundamental to both art and science, PARS introduces new ideas, research, and artistic explanation to topics that are often under-considered but fundamental to our daily lives, the first two titles of the series being Ice and Elasticity. In addition to their books and compositions, the organization curates events that mix art and scientific experiments.

35,00 €, Lars Müller Publishers

Natural Light, Blue Light Room by Bruce Nauman

Natural Light, Blue Light Room by Bruce Nauman

Natural Light, Blue Light Room by Bruce Nauman

Natural Light, Blue Light Room by Bruce Nauman

Coinciding with London’s recent Frieze art fair, Bruce Nauman’s Natural Light, Blue Light Room was exhibited for the first time in 45 years. The exhibition is one of the first examples of architectural intervention in the art world, speaking to the tenets of minimalism, Natural Light, Blue Light Room questions the paramaters and requirements for something to be received as art. 

As a visitor enters the piece, they are forced to engage with severe and dramatic lighting; a constant shift of intensity, along with natural daylight entering from the other side of the space, cause the viewer’s eyes to repeatedly adjust, resulting in a degree of disorientation. In photographs, the exhibition may appear as a peaceful space, but when encountered first-hand, Natural Light, Blue Light Room‘s intention is, in part, to create discomfort. 

About the unexpected physical reaction, Nauman said about the original exhibition: “… in the gallery, there were some skylights above one wall. I installed blue fluorescent lights below the sky lights, it messed up your ability to see the space clearly because when you got under them you started getting a lot of afterimages. Everything became a little jumpy… there was nothing else in the space, so the idea was that it would be hard to know what to focus on and even if you did, it would be hard to focus.”

Photos: Peter Mallet

Drop Time by Makoto Azuma

Drop Time by Azuma Makoto

Drop Time by Azuma Makoto

Drop Time by Azuma Makoto

Drop Time by Azuma Makoto

Drop Time by Azuma Makoto

Drop Time by Azuma Makoto

Makoto Azuma is a Japanese flower artist, botanical sculptor, and co-founder of the conceptual floral shop Jardins des Fleurs; his exhibition, Drop Time, at The Mass gallery in Tokyo consisted of nine elaborate floral arrangements encased in acrylic boxes to monitor their decline over a one month period.

The decay of these arrangements reveals the always-changing nature of flowers, and speaks to life and death, as well as the passing of time, continuing on the artist’s other floral art pieces that inspire us to rethink flowers and plant life from a sculptural perspective.

More at: Makoto Azuma
Photos: Makoto Azuma









© 2017, Aesthetic Post