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As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon & Tschiember

 As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon and Tschiember

 As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon and Tschiember

 As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon and Tschiember

 As Close As You Can For As Long As It Lasts by Gordon and Tschiember

In the picturesque, serene Swiss Alps, Douglas Gordon and Morgane Tschiember’s As close as you can for as long as it lasts is a temporary art installation produced for the biennial event Elevation 1049, supported by the LUMA Foundation. Using fire, smoke, and sound, the piece is a call-and-response between two artists, a vague allusion to the regional tradition of yodeling. Tschiember’s circular fire works with Gordon’s installed sound piece, which is based on our primal fears of unforeseen animals and the dark, under the narrative of a lonely traveler being lured through the woods surrounding Gstaad, by the reassuring smoke and warm fire, as well as the potential of companionship in this setting.

As close as you can for as long as it lasts is on view as a part of Elevation 1049 through March 19, 2017.

More at: Elevation 1049
Photos:  Stefan Altenburger

UV by TJOKEEFE

UV by TJOKEEFE

UV by TJOKEEFE

UV by TJOKEEFE

UV by TJOKEEFE  

UV by TJOKEEFE is a light sculpture composed of ultraviolet LEDs, a powder-coated aluminum bar, and woven nylon thread. The piece is designed to be suspended by its thread flat on the wall, or in a corner; the thread reacts to the UV light projected from below, becoming its own light source, emitting a soft orange glow.

TJOKEEFE, the studio of Michigan-born designer TJ O’Keefe, was established in 2010. With a mission of exploring design and creating powerful objects through compelling minimalism, TJOKEEFE has produced furniture and objects guided by geometry and graphic presence.

More at: TJOKEEFE

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Light is essential to maintain life, the strongest and fastest form of energy; this common, yet mysterious phenomenon has captivated creative thinkers for millenia. As the third volume in their Atlas of Creative Thinking, PARS, the arts and sciences organization led by art historian Hester Aardse and poet Astrid Alben, Findings on Light (designed by Joost Grootens) invites more than fifty artists and scientists to discuss the specific, albeit broad topic of light.

A collection of research and artworks, ranging from humorous, to beautiful and complex, even disturbing, Findings on Light brings new reflection and vision to the compelling subject. “We stipulate only two formal requirements,” PARS says. “Each response, whether it be a note jotted down on a beer mat, a formula, a dialogue, an essay, poem, sketch, a piece of sculpture or a piece of string, has to be in the language of the author’s discipline and relate to the subject.” Consequently, the outcomes are as diverse as their authors and creators.

Based on the idea that creativity and curiosity are fundamental to both art and science, PARS introduces new ideas, research, and artistic explanation to topics that are often under-considered but fundamental to our daily lives, the first two titles of the series being Ice and Elasticity. In addition to their books and compositions, the organization curates events that mix art and scientific experiments.

35,00 €, Lars Müller Publishers

Natural Light, Blue Light Room by Bruce Nauman

Natural Light, Blue Light Room by Bruce Nauman

Natural Light, Blue Light Room by Bruce Nauman

Natural Light, Blue Light Room by Bruce Nauman

Coinciding with London’s recent Frieze art fair, Bruce Nauman’s Natural Light, Blue Light Room was exhibited for the first time in 45 years. The exhibition is one of the first examples of architectural intervention in the art world, speaking to the tenets of minimalism, Natural Light, Blue Light Room questions the paramaters and requirements for something to be received as art. 

As a visitor enters the piece, they are forced to engage with severe and dramatic lighting; a constant shift of intensity, along with natural daylight entering from the other side of the space, cause the viewer’s eyes to repeatedly adjust, resulting in a degree of disorientation. In photographs, the exhibition may appear as a peaceful space, but when encountered first-hand, Natural Light, Blue Light Room‘s intention is, in part, to create discomfort. 

About the unexpected physical reaction, Nauman said about the original exhibition: “… in the gallery, there were some skylights above one wall. I installed blue fluorescent lights below the sky lights, it messed up your ability to see the space clearly because when you got under them you started getting a lot of afterimages. Everything became a little jumpy… there was nothing else in the space, so the idea was that it would be hard to know what to focus on and even if you did, it would be hard to focus.”

Photos: Peter Mallet

Drop Time by Makoto Azuma

Drop Time by Azuma Makoto

Drop Time by Azuma Makoto

Drop Time by Azuma Makoto

Drop Time by Azuma Makoto

Drop Time by Azuma Makoto

Drop Time by Azuma Makoto

Makoto Azuma is a Japanese flower artist, botanical sculptor, and co-founder of the conceptual floral shop Jardins des Fleurs; his exhibition, Drop Time, at The Mass gallery in Tokyo consisted of nine elaborate floral arrangements encased in acrylic boxes to monitor their decline over a one month period.

The decay of these arrangements reveals the always-changing nature of flowers, and speaks to life and death, as well as the passing of time, continuing on the artist’s other floral art pieces that inspire us to rethink flowers and plant life from a sculptural perspective.

More at: Makoto Azuma
Photos: Makoto Azuma

Crescent Dunes by Reuben Wu

Crescent Dunes by Reuben Wu

Crescent Dunes by Reuben Wu

Crescent Dunes by Reuben Wu

Crescent Dunes by Reuben Wu

Photographed in a series by Chicago-based Reuben Wu, the Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project is a solar thermal power installation that produces more than 500,000 megawatt-hours of electricity per year, located about 190 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The organized desert field of mirrors is striking from any perspective, but Wu beautifully captured the panels at dusk, when the rich depth of sky is reflected.

Built by solar power developer SolarReserve, the grouping of over 10,000 heliostats (solar mirrors), collect and focus the sun’s thermal energy to heat molten salt that flows through a 640-foot solar power tower. In turn, the system delivers reliable power to nearly 75,000 homes during its peak season, with zero emissions. It is the first utility-scale facility in the world to demonstrate the advanced molten salt storage technology.

More at: Reuben Wu, SolarReserve

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

As part of their Bibliotheca Universalis series, art book publishing house Taschen have rereleased their meticulous printing of Giambattista Bodoni’s masterwork. Bodoni’s Manuale Tipografico, originally published five years after his death in 1818 (with the assistance of his widow Margherita and foreman Luigi Orsi), set a definitive standard for the printing of text, with a focus on elegance and technical refinement. Official printer for the Duke of Parma, Bodoni declared that well-designed type derives its beauty from four principles: uniformity of design, sharpness and neatness, good taste, and charm. Bodoni, the typeface, continues to be used in both print and digital media to this day.

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of TypographyLook familiar? In addition to book printing and body text, variations of, and Bodoni-influenced type are prominent in fields like branding, advertising, and magazine publishing (where high gloss paper retains the crisp detail of fine serifs.)

The book consists of 142 sets of roman and italic typefaces, as well as Greek, Hebrew, Russian, Arabic, Phoenician, Armenian, Coptic, and Tibetan alphabets, and also includes field-specific and decorative print elements. One often understands typeface simply as a shape for print, but this manual illustrates the importance of script variation and character specificity Bodoni found essential to printing books in multiple languages, with sophistication and retention of nuance. He admired the work of John Baskerville, and studied the artistry of typographic masters Pierre Simon Fournier and Firmin Didot, but in the composition of this manual, Bodoni proceeded to create a print style that was all-new. Considering it necessary for good typography to carry a collection of main fonts large enough so that the difference between the adjacent sizes is not easily seen by a trained eye, Bodoni’s system speaks to his consummate dedication to the craft, and virtually revolutionary approach to printing before the advent of digital typography.

The manual, in this new smaller format, is not only an excellent compendium for a typophile or those interested in printing from a historical standpoint, but a great work of artistry and elegance. As a companion to the original character sets, the book includes an essay by print expert Stephan Füssel, who serves as director of the Institute of the History of the Book at the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz.

While we are on the subject of type, it is worth mentioning the terminology associated with printed and digital text and characters;  there is a piece worth checking out at Co.Design that thoroughly (but in a way that is easy to understand) explains the difference between “typeface” and “font.” 

More at: Taschen

Calvin Marcus: Were Good Men

Opening today at Clearing (Brooklyn), is Calvin Marcus’ second solo exhibition with the gallery, “Were Good Men.”

Consisting of thirty-nine new paintings, many forming an environmental backdrop of grass for the stand-out portraits of war-ravaged soldiers, exaggerated and extreme in their expressions, some startling, others disturbingly comical, the exhibition is an exploration of the realities of fate. Through these characterizations of men, Marcus “observes the relationship between individual and collective identities;” each body is marked with a different sovereign flag, depicting a single universal condition. The show’s title, Were Good Men, speaks to the once vital and living man, all suffering the same fate, sinking back into the grass together.

Calvin Marcus: Were Good Men

Calvin Marcus: Were Good Men

Calvin Marcus: Were Good Men

Calvin Marcus: Were Good Men

Calvin Marcus: Were Good Men

Calvin Marcus is a Los Angeles-based contemporary artist that has exhibited worldwide and is represented by Clearing and David Kordansky. His work is part of the collection at MoMA, New York and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.

Were Good Men runs September 9 through October 30 at Clearing’s Bushwick, Brooklyn gallery.

More at: C L E A R I N G
Photos: C L E A R I N G

Journey by Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

At the base of the Renzo Piano designed Maison Hermès in the heart of the Ginza district of Tokyo, botanist and cactus enthusiast Kohei Oda has developed a new landscape for the presentation of Hermès’ finery. The installation, “Journey,” which runs through September 26, features Oda’s unusual and astonishing plant life serving as an artful backdrop for pieces from the Hermès collection. The masterful arrangment offers a natural contrast and an unexpected air of relativity to the Hermès selections; in the larger displays, a multitude of textural cacti of varying height create an otherworldly scene, and in the smaller windows, dried plant forms interact and are entangled with the house’s accessories.

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

A favorite of The Aesthetic Post, Hiroshima-based Kohei Oda has revolutionized the “face” of cacti. From his world-renowned shop, Qusamura, to international installations, Oda’s work encourages us to reconsider plant life; by presenting cacti in unexpected ways, Oda surely engages the eye, but his horticultural experiments, including those with grafting (transplanting pieces of one plant to grow on another), move into the territory of sculpture and the extraordinary natural possibilities associated. 

Maison Hermès is not only a shopping space, but a structure that houses workshops and offices, exhibition areas, and multimedia quarters, as well as a roof garden and a courtyard with direct access to the Tokyo subway. Its cladding, composed of more than 13,000 glass blocks, developed by acclaimed architect and engineer Renzo Piano, makes for a true architectural destination. The display windows at the base of Maison Hermès are the perfect stage for artists to reexamine “window dressing.”

More at: Maison Hermès, Qusamura
Photos: Hermès

Light Line Table Lamp by Mary Wallis

Light Line by Mary Wallis

Light Line by Mary Wallis

Light Line by Mary Wallis

Light Line by Mary Wallis

A handsome piece of interior art, the The Light Line table lamp, designed by Mary Wallis for Lindsey Adelman Studio, consists of a hand-bent neon tube anchored by a solid metal base. The form, inspired by a street light, is unusually elegant for such a material, and the base is available in a variety of metal finishes, each lending a different tone to the design.

Australian-born lighting designer Mary Wallis has studied at Central Saint Martins, Parsons, and Pratt; based in Brooklyn, she acts as Senior Designer at Lindsey Adelman Studio.

More at: Mary Wallis









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