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Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Frame founders Erik Torstensson and Jens Grede have teamed up with their friend Ben Gorham, the man behind Byredo, to design a menswear capsule collection. Gorham has beautifully expanded the Byredo name from a perfume house to include handsome leather goods and accessories, but this is his first go at ready-to-wear. The collection, “Away From His Hands,” was inspired by American rodeo culture and how youth have put a personal spin on traditional western wear. It makes sense, as Frame, conceived only in 2012, is a label rooted in denim; their effortless European cuts, bridged with ‘70s Los Angeles influence (where the garments are manufactured), makes for the perfect vehicle to deliver Gorham’s ideas.

The collection has some very recognizable Americana references, from patchwork jackets, to the Ford logo, but what makes the concept interesting is how the pieces coexist and meld into sportswear and modern fits, offering a unique, effortless perspective on what we might think of as western wear. 

Away From His Hands was photographed by Torstensson, modeled by singer A.Chal.

Available at: Frame

“Beauty is whatever anyone thinks is beautiful.”

– Rei Kawakubo, founder of Comme de Garçons, who is being honored at The Met Costume Institute’s exhibition Rei Kawakubo/Comme de Garçons: Art of the In-Between, May 4 – September 4.

Earth Day Conscious Gift Guide

The first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, brought to action 20 million Americans, and is widely credited with launching the modern environmental movement. The passage of the landmark Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act, and many other groundbreaking environmental laws soon followed. Twenty years later, Earth Day went global, mobilizing 200 million people in 141 countries, and lifting environmental issues onto the world stage. This April 22, the 47th anniversary of Earth Day, the mission is education; fluency in the concepts of climate change and threats to the environment is the key to action, from laws and policy, to business practices and personal actions.

While the best way to recognize the cause may be to avoid consuming altogether, it is possible to put your money where your mouth is when it comes to environment and sustainability-minded businesses and products. Here are a few selections that forgo standard profit models and support causes and ideas that align with the principles of Earth Day, or perhaps just a little something to remind us to care for the natural world we all require to thrive. 

 

1. The Plant magazine brings together photographers, illustrators, designers, musicians, writers, and visual artists from around the world to share their perceptions and experiences around plants.

. . . During photosynthesis, plants absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen. This opposite pattern of gas use makes plants and people natural partners. Houseplants can also remove toxins from air – up to 87 percent of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) every 24 hours, according to NASA research. VOCs include substances like formaldehyde (present in rugs, vinyl, cigarette smoke and grocery bags), and benzene and trichloroethylene (both found in man-made fibers, inks, solvents and paint).

2A design inspired by the the Danish concept of “hygge,” the Carrie LED lamp by Norm Architects is a lightweight, portable lamp that can be adapted for indoor or outdoor use, its bulb-free LED is powered by a rechargeable battery.

. . . LEDs are up to 80% more efficient than traditional lighting (fluorescent and incandescent); less energy use reduces the demand from power plants and decreases greenhouse gas emissions.

3. Birdhaus by Claesson Koivisto Rune is a subtle reinvention of the classic birdhouse; this numbered edition is made from 3D printed porcelain and produced by OTHR, a forward-thinking collaborative that allows designers to meld technology with heirloom-quality materials.

. . . OTHR’s production process avoids manufacturing more than is needed by implementing technologies such as 3D printing, this keeps waste to a minimum and the typical warehousing of merchandise is bypassed, directly minimizing environmental impact.

4. Made from 18-carat recycled yellow gold, and featuring a panel of grey-blue fossilized dinosaur bone, this ring by designer Monique Péan is a chic ode to both modern design and our planet’s history.

. . . Péan’s sustainability mission revolves around responsible sourcing (never using mined materials), and recycled metals for jewelry designs. In addition to forgoing the often destructive standards of the jewelry industry, Péan is dedicated to supporting global philanthropic organizations. To observe Earth Day, the brand donates a portion of proceeds to Trees for the Future, helping communities to alleviate poverty, affecting positive social change, and improving both local and global environments by working with farming communities along environmentally degraded and highly traveled trade corridors.

5. Peet Rivko’s Balancing Face Oil is a signature blend of organic avocado, jojoba, and prickly pear oils, rich in essential fatty acids and natural antioxidants.

. . . Peet Rivko use no toxic parabens, sulfates, phthalates, PEGs, phenoxyethanol, silicones, or petroleum in their formulations. They work hand-in-hand with suppliers to ensure the supply chains are transparent, and product formulas are manufactured in a wind-powered lab in Southern California. The brand opts for recyclable and biodegradable packaging, and containers are manufactured with sustainability in mind.

6. The Natural Resources Defense Counsel works to safeguard the earth—its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends. Founded in 1970, NRDC combines the power of more than two million members and online activists with the expertise of some 500 scientists, lawyers, and policy advocates across the globe to ensure the rights of all people to the air, the water, and the wild. Your donation is a direct way to sponsor hard-hitting cases and campaigns in defense of nature.

7. Matt & Nat’s Magistral Notepad Sleeve is a a revival of the classic leather notepad jacket with pencil holder, only this time in modern, vegan materials.

. . . The Mat & Nat brand started with a commitment to not using leather or any other animal-based material; their linings are made of 100% recycled plastic bottles, and they’ve recently introduced recycled bicycle tires to their collections.

8. Koval Organic Vodka is made from organic grain, sourced from local farmers and milled on site, for a complete grain-to-bottle product. 

. . . Organic farming eliminates the possibility of soil and water contamination by synthetic chemicals, preserves local wildlife, and encourages biodiversity. Local-sourcing equates to less energy used for transportation, directly reducing carbon dioxide emissions.

9. bkr’s 1L water bottle is the antidote to cheap, disposable plastic bottles; their glass design, sleeved in silicone, motivates you to drink your daily dose of water, without polluting the environment with wasteful plastic.

. . . For every six plastic water bottles used, only one makes it to the recycling bin, U.S. landfills are overflowing with 2 million tons of discarded water bottles alone.

10. Wool Runners by Allbirds are made from breathable, ZQ-certified Merino wool.

. . . ZQ certification ensures high standards of sustainable farming and animal welfare. The wool used requires 60% less energy to produce than typical synthetic materials used in shoes; castor beans are a sustainable source for the green polyurethane used for insoles, and the Allbirds shipping shoebox uses 40% less materials than traditional packaging.

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

FEIT SS17 Balance Collection

New York-based FEIT’s latest collection, Balance, explores the nature of society and our uncertain times by connecting us to the ground, literally. With craftsmanship, select natural materials, and functionality in mind, FEIT marries the traditions of shoemaking and leatherwork, with elegant, minimal designs. These new styles (as well as the debut of a women’s line and a series of bags) reinforce FEIT’s position as not only an expert on clean luxury, but a maker that builds to last, with designs and material choices that are intended to improve with age.

Above, selections from Balance (from top) include an update on the classic court sneaker, featuring Goodyear construction and an unlined body of low-pile, vegetable-tanned English suede; the Wrap Boot is an interpretation of a Jodhpur boot, with a back lace replacing side buckles; inspired by the sailing dry bag, FEIT’s Navy Bag (available in two sizes) is a smart reimagining of a classic, with a variation consisting of a two-piece body that references the design of their hand-sewn shoes.

More at: FEIT

Fall 2017: Helbers & The Row

Helbers Fall 2017 (Menswear)
Helbers Fall 2017

Paul Helbers, who has previously designed at Margiela and Vuitton, was inspired by 19-century paintings by the artist Émile Friant for his fall 2017 menswear collection. Friant’s self-portraits, in rich tones of oil paint, showed a man demanding to be taken seriously by attempting to look older than his age, mostly by his style of dress, which appears more borrowed and oversized than bespoke. Rich in material, Helbers’ collection isn’t overwrought, and stays fresh, despite the tactile nature of the materials and the visual texture that alludes to layered brushstrokes. Helbers is notoriously specific with his material choices and obsession over detail, elevating dressing for comfort on every level. The lines and edges may not be sharp, but this collection is an intelligent exercise in romance meeting minimalism.

More at: Helbers


The Row Fall 2017 Ready-To-Wear
The Row Fall 2017

Similar in philosophy to Helbers’ appreciation and use of fine textiles, The Row has always been highest-quality materials and craftsmanship-based, rather than trend-driven or showy. The fall 2017 collection was perhaps further restrained than their previous work, omitting the extraneous and focusing on timelessness in a minimal palette, without being boring. Intelligent cuts and strict belting were balanced by plays on proportion, and coats that served the woman wearing them before they impressed the bystander. There is being tasteful for the sake of being tasteful, and then there is good taste; this soft power-style of dressing may be what sets The Row apart from a bevy of designers pushing whatever might be “next.”

More at: The Row

MONO by Mae Engelgeer

MONO by Mae Engelgeer

MONO by Mae Engelgeer

MONO by Mae Engelgeer

MONO by Mae Engelgeer

The MONO collection, by Dutch designer Mae Engelgeer, is inspired by vintage kimonos found during travels in Japan. The specific colors, and often graphic shapes seen on kimono linings are artfully translated to Engelgeer’s textiles, applied to blankets, cushions, and tea towels. Refined color stories, from shades of blush, to metal-inspired greys and ultra-brights, in materials like mohair and merino wool, are woven at TextielLab in the Netherlands.

More at: Studio Mae Engelgeer
Photos: Lonneke van der Palen

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide ’16

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide '16

1. Lucetta Magnetic Bike Lights, $20; 2. Japanese Cast Iron Skillet, $84; 3. Mexico from the Inside Out (chef Enrique Olvera), $60; 4. Bäska Snaps, $30; 5. Byredo Incense Candle, $140

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide '16

6. Surf Odyssey, $55; 7. Kid O Go Car, $14; 8. Verso Super Facial Oil, $195; 9. COS Raw-Cut Wool Hat, $35; 10. ILA Wildflower Honey, $35

Journey by Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

At the base of the Renzo Piano designed Maison Hermès in the heart of the Ginza district of Tokyo, botanist and cactus enthusiast Kohei Oda has developed a new landscape for the presentation of Hermès’ finery. The installation, “Journey,” which runs through September 26, features Oda’s unusual and astonishing plant life serving as an artful backdrop for pieces from the Hermès collection. The masterful arrangment offers a natural contrast and an unexpected air of relativity to the Hermès selections; in the larger displays, a multitude of textural cacti of varying height create an otherworldly scene, and in the smaller windows, dried plant forms interact and are entangled with the house’s accessories.

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

Kohei Oda at Maison Hermès

A favorite of The Aesthetic Post, Hiroshima-based Kohei Oda has revolutionized the “face” of cacti. From his world-renowned shop, Qusamura, to international installations, Oda’s work encourages us to reconsider plant life; by presenting cacti in unexpected ways, Oda surely engages the eye, but his horticultural experiments, including those with grafting (transplanting pieces of one plant to grow on another), move into the territory of sculpture and the extraordinary natural possibilities associated. 

Maison Hermès is not only a shopping space, but a structure that houses workshops and offices, exhibition areas, and multimedia quarters, as well as a roof garden and a courtyard with direct access to the Tokyo subway. Its cladding, composed of more than 13,000 glass blocks, developed by acclaimed architect and engineer Renzo Piano, makes for a true architectural destination. The display windows at the base of Maison Hermès are the perfect stage for artists to reexamine “window dressing.”

More at: Maison Hermès, Qusamura
Photos: Hermès

Dressing for the Season: Theory Fall Menswear & The Row Fall 2016

Though the presentation of these collections took place in February, the time to wear them will soon be upon us, so let’s recap two favorites . . . 

Theory Fall 2016 (Menswear)
Theory Fall 2016 Menswear

Theory Fall 2016 Menswear

Theory Fall 2016 Menswear

Theory Fall 2016 Menswear

Head of menswear at Theory, Ben Stubbington’s approach to seasons doesn’t involve of-the-moment trends or hype pieces, but instead, tried-and-true garments that are interchangeable between months and are made to last a very long time. Restraint is key, and as Stubbington comments, “there are no frills, and deliberately so.” This isn’t to say the collection is without character, citing Cy Twombly as inspiration, the charm is executed in inconspicuous sweater patterns and keen use of material. Following Theory’s hallmark of intelligent design, several of the garments are quietly inventive, from hidden pockets to removable layers, even the introduction of Neoteric, a new Swiss-engineered sport material.

More at: Theory


 

The Row Fall 2016 Ready-To-Wear
The Row Fall 2016

The Row Fall 2016

The Row is known for sumptuous fabrics, and the Fall 2016 collection upholds this reputation in a flawlessly minimal way. This is not the uptight minimalism of overcut, strict line-based design, but instead exquisite tailoring that hides the unimportant details and let’s the fabric do the talking. Coats that you can’t imagine coming from any other name were presented alongside high-waisted trousers, sheath dresses, and silhouettes that are loose-fitting and seemingly oversized, but maintained length and polish. With their line, and this collection specifically, the Olsens extend the secret to dressing impeccably, but never “designer.”

More at: The Row

Maison Kitsuné AW16 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

As the weather grows hotter and hotter outside, it is a nice time to look forward to cool fall air, as well as the wardrobe that comes along with . . . 

Maison Kitsuné’s A/W 2016 collection, Love Rises, takes Japanese imagery head-on; Kitsuné’s bridge between Tokyo and Paris could not be more evident in this collection, as cofounders Gildas Loaëc and Kuroki Masaya found inspiration in the Hayao Miyazaki film The Wind Rises.

Mt. Fuji, sculpted Niwaki trees, and the rising sun all make graphic appearances, lending a retro feel to the pieces, still narrowly avoiding a cartoon or brand-centric vibe; less directly-themed garments, especially jackets of unexpected fabric choices and patchwork, are reminiscent of Comme des Garçons, and feature cuts that elegantly reference Japanese tradition.

With Love Rises, Kitsuné so beautifully takes it one notch further than the idea; one step ahead of an already-done Japanese theme, one ahead of preppy, and surely one ahead for the brand.

Photos: Pierpaolo Ferrari
More at: Maison Kitsuné









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