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The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape by Diane Tuft

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

Photographed by acclaimed environmental fine art photographer Diane Tuft, The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape (published by Assouline) is a collection of images illustrating the alarming melt of the Arctic Circle. Tuft’s work is a direct look at climate change’s radical effect on a once pristine frozen landscape, now both haunting and unavoidably beautiful, from the North Pole, to mountain glaciers of Svalbard, Norway (an archipelago located 600 miles north of Norway’s northernmost point, where mountain glaciers would be undisturbed by humans), to the awe-inspiring icebergs and ice sheet of Greenland.

By the end of this century, it is predicted that the ocean will rise eight feet, causing the displacement of millions of people throughout the Earth. Ocean rise will be due to three factors: the melting of mountain glaciers, the thermal expansion of the ocean, and the melting of the Greenland ice sheet. Tuft’s visual record of this ruinous environment serves as a reminder to respect and understand the science of our ever-changing planet.

Diane Tuft specializes in infrared and ultraviolet photography, creating striking images that record what the naked eye cannot always see. Her travels to destinations where ultraviolet light is in excess result in otherworldly, vivid colors that are made possible by the surplus of this light, but also directly reflect the serious environmental imbalance.

More at: Assouline, Diane Tuft

Earth Day Conscious Gift Guide

The first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, brought to action 20 million Americans, and is widely credited with launching the modern environmental movement. The passage of the landmark Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act, and many other groundbreaking environmental laws soon followed. Twenty years later, Earth Day went global, mobilizing 200 million people in 141 countries, and lifting environmental issues onto the world stage. This April 22, the 47th anniversary of Earth Day, the mission is education; fluency in the concepts of climate change and threats to the environment is the key to action, from laws and policy, to business practices and personal actions.

While the best way to recognize the cause may be to avoid consuming altogether, it is possible to put your money where your mouth is when it comes to environment and sustainability-minded businesses and products. Here are a few selections that forgo standard profit models and support causes and ideas that align with the principles of Earth Day, or perhaps just a little something to remind us to care for the natural world we all require to thrive. 

 

1. The Plant magazine brings together photographers, illustrators, designers, musicians, writers, and visual artists from around the world to share their perceptions and experiences around plants.

. . . During photosynthesis, plants absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen. This opposite pattern of gas use makes plants and people natural partners. Houseplants can also remove toxins from air – up to 87 percent of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) every 24 hours, according to NASA research. VOCs include substances like formaldehyde (present in rugs, vinyl, cigarette smoke and grocery bags), and benzene and trichloroethylene (both found in man-made fibers, inks, solvents and paint).

2A design inspired by the the Danish concept of “hygge,” the Carrie LED lamp by Norm Architects is a lightweight, portable lamp that can be adapted for indoor or outdoor use, its bulb-free LED is powered by a rechargeable battery.

. . . LEDs are up to 80% more efficient than traditional lighting (fluorescent and incandescent); less energy use reduces the demand from power plants and decreases greenhouse gas emissions.

3. Birdhaus by Claesson Koivisto Rune is a subtle reinvention of the classic birdhouse; this numbered edition is made from 3D printed porcelain and produced by OTHR, a forward-thinking collaborative that allows designers to meld technology with heirloom-quality materials.

. . . OTHR’s production process avoids manufacturing more than is needed by implementing technologies such as 3D printing, this keeps waste to a minimum and the typical warehousing of merchandise is bypassed, directly minimizing environmental impact.

4. Made from 18-carat recycled yellow gold, and featuring a panel of grey-blue fossilized dinosaur bone, this ring by designer Monique Péan is a chic ode to both modern design and our planet’s history.

. . . Péan’s sustainability mission revolves around responsible sourcing (never using mined materials), and recycled metals for jewelry designs. In addition to forgoing the often destructive standards of the jewelry industry, Péan is dedicated to supporting global philanthropic organizations. To observe Earth Day, the brand donates a portion of proceeds to Trees for the Future, helping communities to alleviate poverty, affecting positive social change, and improving both local and global environments by working with farming communities along environmentally degraded and highly traveled trade corridors.

5. Peet Rivko’s Balancing Face Oil is a signature blend of organic avocado, jojoba, and prickly pear oils, rich in essential fatty acids and natural antioxidants.

. . . Peet Rivko use no toxic parabens, sulfates, phthalates, PEGs, phenoxyethanol, silicones, or petroleum in their formulations. They work hand-in-hand with suppliers to ensure the supply chains are transparent, and product formulas are manufactured in a wind-powered lab in Southern California. The brand opts for recyclable and biodegradable packaging, and containers are manufactured with sustainability in mind.

6. The Natural Resources Defense Counsel works to safeguard the earth—its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends. Founded in 1970, NRDC combines the power of more than two million members and online activists with the expertise of some 500 scientists, lawyers, and policy advocates across the globe to ensure the rights of all people to the air, the water, and the wild. Your donation is a direct way to sponsor hard-hitting cases and campaigns in defense of nature.

7. Matt & Nat’s Magistral Notepad Sleeve is a a revival of the classic leather notepad jacket with pencil holder, only this time in modern, vegan materials.

. . . The Mat & Nat brand started with a commitment to not using leather or any other animal-based material; their linings are made of 100% recycled plastic bottles, and they’ve recently introduced recycled bicycle tires to their collections.

8. Koval Organic Vodka is made from organic grain, sourced from local farmers and milled on site, for a complete grain-to-bottle product. 

. . . Organic farming eliminates the possibility of soil and water contamination by synthetic chemicals, preserves local wildlife, and encourages biodiversity. Local-sourcing equates to less energy used for transportation, directly reducing carbon dioxide emissions.

9. bkr’s 1L water bottle is the antidote to cheap, disposable plastic bottles; their glass design, sleeved in silicone, motivates you to drink your daily dose of water, without polluting the environment with wasteful plastic.

. . . For every six plastic water bottles used, only one makes it to the recycling bin, U.S. landfills are overflowing with 2 million tons of discarded water bottles alone.

10. Wool Runners by Allbirds are made from breathable, ZQ-certified Merino wool.

. . . ZQ certification ensures high standards of sustainable farming and animal welfare. The wool used requires 60% less energy to produce than typical synthetic materials used in shoes; castor beans are a sustainable source for the green polyurethane used for insoles, and the Allbirds shipping shoebox uses 40% less materials than traditional packaging.

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Findings on Light from PARS’ Atlas of Creative Thinking

Light is essential to maintain life, the strongest and fastest form of energy; this common, yet mysterious phenomenon has captivated creative thinkers for millenia. As the third volume in their Atlas of Creative Thinking, PARS, the arts and sciences organization led by art historian Hester Aardse and poet Astrid Alben, Findings on Light (designed by Joost Grootens) invites more than fifty artists and scientists to discuss the specific, albeit broad topic of light.

A collection of research and artworks, ranging from humorous, to beautiful and complex, even disturbing, Findings on Light brings new reflection and vision to the compelling subject. “We stipulate only two formal requirements,” PARS says. “Each response, whether it be a note jotted down on a beer mat, a formula, a dialogue, an essay, poem, sketch, a piece of sculpture or a piece of string, has to be in the language of the author’s discipline and relate to the subject.” Consequently, the outcomes are as diverse as their authors and creators.

Based on the idea that creativity and curiosity are fundamental to both art and science, PARS introduces new ideas, research, and artistic explanation to topics that are often under-considered but fundamental to our daily lives, the first two titles of the series being Ice and Elasticity. In addition to their books and compositions, the organization curates events that mix art and scientific experiments.

35,00 €, Lars Müller Publishers

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide ’16

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide '16

1. Lucetta Magnetic Bike Lights, $20; 2. Japanese Cast Iron Skillet, $84; 3. Mexico from the Inside Out (chef Enrique Olvera), $60; 4. Bäska Snaps, $30; 5. Byredo Incense Candle, $140

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide '16

6. Surf Odyssey, $55; 7. Kid O Go Car, $14; 8. Verso Super Facial Oil, $195; 9. COS Raw-Cut Wool Hat, $35; 10. ILA Wildflower Honey, $35

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

As part of their Bibliotheca Universalis series, art book publishing house Taschen have rereleased their meticulous printing of Giambattista Bodoni’s masterwork. Bodoni’s Manuale Tipografico, originally published five years after his death in 1818 (with the assistance of his widow Margherita and foreman Luigi Orsi), set a definitive standard for the printing of text, with a focus on elegance and technical refinement. Official printer for the Duke of Parma, Bodoni declared that well-designed type derives its beauty from four principles: uniformity of design, sharpness and neatness, good taste, and charm. Bodoni, the typeface, continues to be used in both print and digital media to this day.

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of Typography

Bodoni: The Complete Manual of TypographyLook familiar? In addition to book printing and body text, variations of, and Bodoni-influenced type are prominent in fields like branding, advertising, and magazine publishing (where high gloss paper retains the crisp detail of fine serifs.)

The book consists of 142 sets of roman and italic typefaces, as well as Greek, Hebrew, Russian, Arabic, Phoenician, Armenian, Coptic, and Tibetan alphabets, and also includes field-specific and decorative print elements. One often understands typeface simply as a shape for print, but this manual illustrates the importance of script variation and character specificity Bodoni found essential to printing books in multiple languages, with sophistication and retention of nuance. He admired the work of John Baskerville, and studied the artistry of typographic masters Pierre Simon Fournier and Firmin Didot, but in the composition of this manual, Bodoni proceeded to create a print style that was all-new. Considering it necessary for good typography to carry a collection of main fonts large enough so that the difference between the adjacent sizes is not easily seen by a trained eye, Bodoni’s system speaks to his consummate dedication to the craft, and virtually revolutionary approach to printing before the advent of digital typography.

The manual, in this new smaller format, is not only an excellent compendium for a typophile or those interested in printing from a historical standpoint, but a great work of artistry and elegance. As a companion to the original character sets, the book includes an essay by print expert Stephan Füssel, who serves as director of the Institute of the History of the Book at the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz.

While we are on the subject of type, it is worth mentioning the terminology associated with printed and digital text and characters;  there is a piece worth checking out at Co.Design that thoroughly (but in a way that is easy to understand) explains the difference between “typeface” and “font.” 

More at: Taschen

Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight

Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight

In conjunction with the debut of the exhibition Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York (September 16, 2016 – January 2, 2017), Yale University Press is publishing a companion book that serves as an evaluation of the artist Carmen Herrera’s life and art.

The 101-year-old Herrera, born in Havana, has lived in New York City since the mid-‘50s; having painted for seven decades, it is only of late that her work has been so internationally recognized and delinquently honored. Exploring her career, that includes time in Cuba, France, and New York, the book examines her early studies, her involvement with the Salon des Réalités Nouvelles in post-war Paris, and her innovative output of hard-edge abstraction in New York.

Exploring Herrera’s evolution as an artist, especially shaped by her time in Paris, where she honed her technique to cleaner lines and a reduced palette, a style she continued to evolve stateside, the book speaks to a lifelong dedication to her art. While her male contemporaries such as Frank Stella and Barnett Newman received substantial attention, Herrera quietly continued her work, and it was not until the age of 89 that she sold her first painting; ultimately, museums including MoMA, the Hirschhorn, and Tate Modern began acquiring Herrera’s pieces, which also include sculptural works, which Herrera refers to as “estructuras.”

Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight

Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight

Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight

Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight

Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight

In addition to the 80 works illustrated as color plates, in what is the most extensive representation of Herrera’s work to date, the book includes personal photographs and further material to enrich the record of her life and her life’s work. Lines of Sight was assembled and written by Dana Miller (Richard DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection at the Whitney), with contributions by Serge Lemoine, Gerardo Mosquera, and Edward J. Sullivan, and chronology by Mónica Espinel. 

The book Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight is available for pre-order, to be released in October.

The exhibition Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight at the Whitney Museum of American Art, runs September 16, 2016 through January 2, 2017, and will continue to the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio (February 4 – April 16, 2017).

Images: Whitney Museum of American Art, portrait of Carmen Herrera by Andreas Laszlo Konrath
More at: Yale University Press, Whitney Museum of American Art

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide ’15

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

1. Playtype Notepad, $9; 2. Playsam Mefistofel Racer, $60; 3. Rok Manual Espresso Maker, $200; 4. Strange Invisible Perfumes Musc Botanique, $285; 5. The School of Life Memento Mori Glass Paperweight, $40

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

6. Far North Gustaf Navy Strength Gin, $50; 7. Magnus Nilsson: The Nordic Cookbook, $32; 8. Recomposed By Max Richter: Vivaldi, The Four Seasons, vinyl, $24; 9. Bella Freud 1970 Candle, $70; 10. Palomino Blackwing 602 Pencils, 12 pack, $22

Public Natures: Evolutionary Infrastructures

Public Natures: Evolutionary Infrastructures

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Public Natures: Evolutionary Infrastructures

Public Natures: Evolutionary Infrastructures is a hybrid manifesto/monograph from New York City-based firm Weiss/Manfredi; this collection of essays, roundtable discussions, and selected projects by the firm helps to identify new terms and models for architecture’s evolution in the field of landscape and urban territory. The functionally designed urban life is thoughtfully organized in the book, which features case studies such as the Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle, and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, as well as contributions by academics and theorists such as Kenneth Frampton, Preston Scott Cohen, Felipe Correa, Keller Easterling, Paul Lewis, Hashim Sarkis, and Nader Tehrani; with a foreword by Barry Bergdoll.

Public Natures was designed in collaboration with studio Project Projects, and the format was developed to balance photographs and drawings alongside reader-friendly text and detail points. A beautifully offset-printed bookcloth cover is enlivened by a bold green book block, and inside, contrasting paper stocks articulate the shift between the theoretical and case study sections.

More at: Princeton Architectural Press
Photos: Project Projects

Down the Long Driveway, You’ll See It

Down the long driveway, you'll see

“Down the long driveway, you’ll see it” isn’t the shortest title, but it does perfectly fit the content of this beautiful new book from photographer Mary Gaudin (with text by Matthew Arnold).

There are plenty of books dedicated to modern and mid-century architecture, but few approach the subject with such a human format.

Across New Zealand exist many modernist gems, and Mary focuses not necessarily on the lines or design influence, but the actual life of these homes. The architecture serves as a frame for real places where people spend their days and lives, perhaps not always with the polish of a Dwell editorial, but embracing a style of architecture that represents a new and better way of home life.

These houses also reflect their environment, and it is fascinating to see how, often seamlessly, they are incorporated into New Zealand’s natural landscape. One great example is the Einhorn House, which backs onto the Karori Bird Sanctuary, leaving the owners with glimpses of the rare Hihi bird feeding in their garden.

As for the title, it comes from an e-mail that homeowner Bruce Martin sent giving directions to his home, a reminder that an important house isn’t always a monument, but a place someone lives.

Down the long driveway, you'll see it

Down the long driveway, you'll see it

Down the long driveway, you'll see it

Down the long driveway, you'll see it

Down the long driveway, you'll see it

Photography: Mary Gaudin
More at/purchase: downthelongdriveway.com

Last-Minute Valentine’s Day Gift Guide

2015 Valentine Gift Guide

Sure, Valentine’s Day is a consumerism-based spectacle that we should all forfeit, but in lieu of disposable, heart-shaped drugstore purchases, a thoughtful gift: be it a lavish candle or a simple home-cooked dinner, should be met with welcome by any lover (or your loveless self).

Here are some ideas that will not disappoint; and if you enjoy spending time in the kitchen, head over to Saveur for a great guide to Valentine’s Day cooking, from breakfast in bed to romantic cocktails.

As for flowers, we’ll talk about that tomorrow . . . 

1. Eating with the Chefs, $60; 2. Nikka Whisky, $40; 3. Fred’s Peppered Peanuts, $38;
4. Japanese Folding Knife, $28; 5. Balmain Silk Hair Perfume, $40; 6. Rodin Lip Balm, $34;
7. Byredo Loveless Candle, $80









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