Aesthetic Post

Piece in Brief: Kuta Table Lamp by Vico Magistretti

Kuta by Vico Magistretti

Kuta by Vico Magistretti

Kuta by Vico Magistretti

Designed in 1978, and originally manufactured by Oluce, the Kuta lamp by industrial designer Vico Magistretti is an enduring icon of Italian Modernism that is as handsome today as it surely was upon introduction.

The design consists of a white marble base, a metal stem (originally black, with the current production in chrome finish), and a hand-painted (white or black) aluminum reflector plate that offers the effect of a solar eclipse. Today, Kuta is produced by Milan-based NEMO, and is also available in a wall-mounted option.

Vico Magistretti’s work spans from high-concept architecture to untraditional, mass-produced furniture and lighting, his output includes many important design pieces of the time, and he was the first to conceive an elegant chair made from plastic, the Selene.

Vintage Kuta table lamps produced by Oluce can be found on 1stdibs, starting around $1000, Nemo’s make is available from authorized dealers, with a price around $400.

More at: NEMO
Photos: NEMO, Artnet

Ceal Floyer at 303 Gallery / New York

Ceal Floyer at 303 Gallery NYC

Ceal Floyer at 303 Gallery NYC

Ceal Floyer at 303 Gallery NYC

Ceal Floyer at 303 Gallery NYC

A key figure in post-conceptualism from the ‘90s to today, Ceal Floyer was born in 1968 and is based in Berlin. For her current exhibition at 303 Gallery in New York City, the artist presents works in the format of video, photography, and sculpture. Throughout her career, Floyer has explored a visually simple approach to conjuring puzzle and thought through her work; in this exhibition, a collection of pieces extend on the unseen or unthought aspects of the everyday.

One of the exhibition’s key pieces, Plughole, features a video from the perspective of looking at a sink drain, water being redirected to fill each hole, as described by the gallery: “the drain’s function as a receptacle for water becomes a kind of short-circuit, as water itself becomes the material that plugs its own pathway.” Seemingly mundane actions are presented to elicit thoughts about sub-patterns or activity that exists in what sometimes feels like another dimension. Contacts is a series of 128 digital drawings, each geometric form created by tracing the paths between phone numbers on Floyer’s keypad. Works like Domino Effect, a long row of too-tightly arranged dominoes, and Newton’s Cradle, the classic metal ball pendulum, this time tangled and motionless, incur thoughts about what these objects stand for in terms of form or purpose, and if they even have one. Within all of these minimalist queries, there is a direct wit and humor, which can’t always be said for this genre of visual art.

Through July 14, 303 Gallery (555 W. 21st St.).

More at: 303 Gallery

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

Holiday House in Corsier by Bunq Architectectes

At the left bank of Lake Geneva, Corsier is the idyllic Swiss location of this holiday villa that introduces an updated aesthetic to the traditional architecture of the area. Designed by Nyon-based Bunq Architectes, the structure fills an already developed residential space by placement in the garden area next to an existing villa.

The house’s exterior is clad in a facade of boards that have been treated in the Japanese shou sugi ban method of charring, which results in weather and rot-proof wood that is free of chemicals or superfluous decoration. The exterior is designed in a manner that allows the facade to fold open at the placement of glass doors and panels, maximizing the indoor/outdoor architectural layout.

The house’s rooms are positioned to open to and make ideal use of the outdoor space, and thoughtful landscape-style windows and large glass panels flood the space with light. Built-in storage and an integrated, curved staircase seamlessly fit into the clean white and wood-finished interior.

More at: Bunq Architectes
Photos: David Gagnebin de Bons

Listening / Viewing: Jean-Michel Blais – Il

Directed by Dan & PAG.

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Frame founders Erik Torstensson and Jens Grede have teamed up with their friend Ben Gorham, the man behind Byredo, to design a menswear capsule collection. Gorham has beautifully expanded the Byredo name from a perfume house to include handsome leather goods and accessories, but this is his first go at ready-to-wear. The collection, “Away From His Hands,” was inspired by American rodeo culture and how youth have put a personal spin on traditional western wear. It makes sense, as Frame, conceived only in 2012, is a label rooted in denim; their effortless European cuts, bridged with ‘70s Los Angeles influence (where the garments are manufactured), makes for the perfect vehicle to deliver Gorham’s ideas.

The collection has some very recognizable Americana references, from patchwork jackets, to the Ford logo, but what makes the concept interesting is how the pieces coexist and meld into sportswear and modern fits, offering a unique, effortless perspective on what we might think of as western wear. 

Away From His Hands was photographed by Torstensson, modeled by singer A.Chal.

Available at: Frame

Tool Roots by Mike Abelson at Maison Hermès

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Postalco co-founder and designer Mike Abelson is the latest to oversee the window design at Hermès’ Ginza store in Tokyo. The display, titled Tool Roots, features a variety of tools and work objects arranged and broken down by their primary elements; Tool Roots is Ableson’s response to the Hermès 2017 theme of “Object Sense,” with 3-dimensional charts of daily objects mixed with drawings. The presentation is interwoven with Hermès products, and spans across two large display cases, as well as smaller feature boxes.

“Maybe tools are like colors? Perhaps they can be blended together, the way colors are, to form new objects with completely different roles?” says Abelson.

Tool Roots runs through July 11, 2017.

More at: Maison Hermès, Postalco
Photos: Mike Abelson

Listening / Viewing: Seramic – I Got You

Directed by Yagaboo.

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape by Diane Tuft

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

Photographed by acclaimed environmental fine art photographer Diane Tuft, The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape (published by Assouline) is a collection of images illustrating the alarming melt of the Arctic Circle. Tuft’s work is a direct look at climate change’s radical effect on a once pristine frozen landscape, now both haunting and unavoidably beautiful, from the North Pole, to mountain glaciers of Svalbard, Norway (an archipelago located 600 miles north of Norway’s northernmost point, where mountain glaciers would be undisturbed by humans), to the awe-inspiring icebergs and ice sheet of Greenland.

By the end of this century, it is predicted that the ocean will rise eight feet, causing the displacement of millions of people throughout the Earth. Ocean rise will be due to three factors: the melting of mountain glaciers, the thermal expansion of the ocean, and the melting of the Greenland ice sheet. Tuft’s visual record of this ruinous environment serves as a reminder to respect and understand the science of our ever-changing planet.

Diane Tuft specializes in infrared and ultraviolet photography, creating striking images that record what the naked eye cannot always see. Her travels to destinations where ultraviolet light is in excess result in otherworldly, vivid colors that are made possible by the surplus of this light, but also directly reflect the serious environmental imbalance.

More at: Assouline, Diane Tuft

“Beauty is whatever anyone thinks is beautiful.”

– Rei Kawakubo, founder of Comme de Garçons, who is being honored at The Met Costume Institute’s exhibition Rei Kawakubo/Comme de Garçons: Art of the In-Between, May 4 – September 4.

Forms in Space… by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans

Forms in Space... by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans

Forms in Space... by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans

Forms in Space... by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans

Cerith Wyn Evans’ installation, Forms in Space… by Light (in Time), at the Tate Britain’s Duveen Galleries, is an exploration of form and perspective via more than a mile of neon lighting; strict lines and graphic shapes of light are suspended from the ceiling, referencing physical and kinetic gestures.

At first glance, the almost chaotic nature of the installation is similar in visual style to “light writing,” a popular trend in art photography, however, as the viewer moves along the installation and perspective shifts, the uniform arrangement appears to be in motion. Structured in three parts that emerge from a single neon ring and develop into three disc forms, Wyn Evan’s implemented choreology – the practice of translating movement into notational form, and was influenced by the precise work of Japanese Noh theater, a gesture-based, highly-crafted performance art. The artist describes the three forms as “occulist witnesses,” a reference to artist Marcel Duchamp’s sculpture The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), which was donated to the Tate’s collection in 1975.

Best known for his use of neon lighting, the work of Welsh conceptual artist Cerith Wyn Evans ranges from experimental film, to installation, sculpture, photography, and text. Other light installations by Wyn Evans include E=V=E=N=T (2015), a sculpture commissioned for Malmo Live, and Arr/Dep (imaginary landscape for the birds) (2006), at Lufthansa’s Frankfurt headquarters.

Forms in Space… by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans runs until August, 20 at Tate Britain, London.

More at: Tate Britain
Photos: Joe Humphreys © Tate









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