Aesthetic Post

Listening / Viewing: Angels Dust – Tears

Directed by Anthony Cedric Vuagniaux.

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

House for a Photographer by FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects

Designed by Kusatsu-based FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects, House for a Photographer is a live/work space that joins a photographer’s studio with residence.

Situated on a road that runs through the countryside of the Shiga prefecture in Japan, the construction is placed directly opposite the village shrine. At front-facing street view, there are no windows, but a minimal exterior of mortar and galvanized steel sheeting, which reflects dull light.

Inside, the house is filled with plays on light and shadow. A courtyard brings a surplus of natural light and connects the spaces, allowing for an indoor/outdoor mood that connects the house with nature. Wood finishing warms the more private areas, and instead of segmenting the space to rooms with specific function, it was designed to be dynamic and accommodate how the resident lives, rather than follow the traditional tenets of residential structure. A place to not only make work, but display, the home features a full gallery, and the light-filled convertible living area also functions as a photo studio.

More at: FORM / Kouichi Kimora Architects
Photos: Yoshihiro Asada, Norihito Yamauchi

Ultraviolet Break of Day by Marcus Wendt

Ultraviolet Break of Day by Marcus Wendt

Ultraviolet Break of Day by Marcus Wendt

Ultraviolet Break of Day by Marcus Wendt

Ultraviolet Break of Day by Marcus Wendt

Ultraviolet Break of Day by Marcus Wendt

With a case of jet-lag induced insomnia, London-based photographer Marcus Wendt found himself photographing the streets of Hong Kong, Shenzen, and Seoul at the strangest hours. From the Kowloon area of Hong Kong, to Shenzhen’s Huaqiangbei “The World’s Greatest Electronics Market,” the images evoke a quiet and equally chaotic dimension most of us will only have the surreal pleasure of seeing in photographs.

More at: Marcus Wendt

Listening / Viewing: Crooked Colours – Come Back To You

Directed by J. A. Moreno.

Glassware for Peroni Nastro Azzurro by Shiro Studio

Glassware for Peroni Nastro Azzurro by Shiro Studio

Glassware for Peroni Nastro Azzurro by Shiro Studio

Glassware for Peroni Nastro Azzurro by Shiro Studio

Glassware for Peroni Nastro Azzurro by Shiro Studio

As the creative director of London-based Shiro Studio, Andrea Morgante was chosen by Peroni Nastro Azzurro UK to update the iconic beer brand’s glassware. As one of the world’s most recognizable beers, and one that is intrinsically connected to its Italian heritage, Morgante was mindful of this provenance when rethinking the design.

In Morgante’s words, “To redesign the iconic Peroni Nastro Azzurro glass is an exquisite, delicate challenge: the current glass is somehow iconic so I wanted to introduce a considerate evolution rather than a forceful, arbitrary redesign. I wanted the new glassware range to embrace the brand’s heritage whilst conveying a sense of modernity and innovation. I was equally interested in exploiting the optical quality of the borosilicate glass, one of the clearest, lightest and most durable type of glasses available, exploring how light could be compressed and refracted through the liquid by using variations on the glass thickness. Not many artisans can skillfully handcraft borosilicate glass and I had the privilege to work closely for several months with one of the few Pyrex glassmaking companies located in north-eastern Italy.”

The design’s ribbed surface is not only a detail that engages light to better illustrate the beer’s liquid quality, it is specifically designed to enhance the nucleation process, which catalyzes carbonation, resulting in a prolonged stream of bubbles that enhance the taste and drinking experience.

The line consists of four pieces of varying volume, from from the 568ml pint glass to a 200ml tumbler for Peroni-based cocktails. The glassware is currently being released in select UK venues.

More at: Shiro Studio
Photos: Shiro Studio

Arc Zero by James Tapscott

Arc Zero by James Tapscott

Arc Zero by James Tapscott

Arc Zero by James Tapscott

Arc Zero by James Tapscott

Arc Zero by James Tapscott

As part of the recent Japan Alps Art Festival in the northwestern Nagano prefecture of Japan, Australian artist James Tapscott was commissioned to install a site-specific work, which he titled Arc Zero – Nimbus, a ring of mist that encircles a bridge leading guests to the grounds of Hotokizaki Kanon-ji, a local Buddhist Temple.

With mist sourced from the local river water, the installation explores the journey of melting snow to water, down the mountain, processed by the land, and back up again as evaporated mist.

The steel ring includes LED strips and is clad in laser-cut acrylic mirror, to better camouflage into the environment. At day, the mist produces produces rainbows and refracts the natural light, and as it gets darker, illumination lends an otherworldly mood to the piece.

More at: Japan Alps Art Festival
Photos: James Tapscott

Add Stool by ASK

Add Stool by ASK

Add Stool by ASK

Add Stool by ASK
Add by ASK (Atelier Steffen Kehrle) is a elegant, versatile design manufactured by German studio and wood shop Stattmann Neue Moebel. To be used as a stool or small table, the stackable form consists of three bent wood legs and a perfectly balanced round seat; the fine grain of sustainably-forested ash, and a sophisticated palette of stain options elevate a piece of furniture that is often considered utilitarian.

Bavarian-born Steffen Kehrle designs a broad spectrum of products and objects, in industrial, cultural, and museum contexts. Imaginative, but mindful of furniture’s design history, Kehrle rethinks and modernizes references through his use of form and detail.

Stattmann Neue Moebel, the fourth-generation label of a wood workshop located near the village of Ascheberg, Germany, specializes in carpentry and fine wood work, implementing modern designs to a traditional approach of construction.

More at: Stattmann Neue Moebel, ASK
Photos: Julien Renault

Listening / Viewing: Her – Blossom Roses

Directed by Liswaya.

Piece in Brief: Kuta Table Lamp by Vico Magistretti

Kuta by Vico Magistretti

Kuta by Vico Magistretti

Kuta by Vico Magistretti

Designed in 1978, and originally manufactured by Oluce, the Kuta lamp by industrial designer Vico Magistretti is an enduring icon of Italian Modernism that is as handsome today as it surely was upon introduction.

The design consists of a white marble base, a metal stem (originally black, with the current production in chrome finish), and a hand-painted (white or black) aluminum reflector plate that offers the effect of a solar eclipse. Today, Kuta is produced by Milan-based NEMO, and is also available in a wall-mounted option.

Vico Magistretti’s work spans from high-concept architecture to untraditional, mass-produced furniture and lighting, his output includes many important design pieces of the time, and he was the first to conceive an elegant chair made from plastic, the Selene.

Vintage Kuta table lamps produced by Oluce can be found on 1stdibs, starting around $1000, Nemo’s make is available from authorized dealers, with a price around $400.

More at: NEMO
Photos: NEMO, Artnet

Ceal Floyer at 303 Gallery / New York

Ceal Floyer at 303 Gallery NYC

Ceal Floyer at 303 Gallery NYC

Ceal Floyer at 303 Gallery NYC

Ceal Floyer at 303 Gallery NYC

A key figure in post-conceptualism from the ‘90s to today, Ceal Floyer was born in 1968 and is based in Berlin. For her current exhibition at 303 Gallery in New York City, the artist presents works in the format of video, photography, and sculpture. Throughout her career, Floyer has explored a visually simple approach to conjuring puzzle and thought through her work; in this exhibition, a collection of pieces extend on the unseen or unthought aspects of the everyday.

One of the exhibition’s key pieces, Plughole, features a video from the perspective of looking at a sink drain, water being redirected to fill each hole, as described by the gallery: “the drain’s function as a receptacle for water becomes a kind of short-circuit, as water itself becomes the material that plugs its own pathway.” Seemingly mundane actions are presented to elicit thoughts about sub-patterns or activity that exists in what sometimes feels like another dimension. Contacts is a series of 128 digital drawings, each geometric form created by tracing the paths between phone numbers on Floyer’s keypad. Works like Domino Effect, a long row of too-tightly arranged dominoes, and Newton’s Cradle, the classic metal ball pendulum, this time tangled and motionless, incur thoughts about what these objects stand for in terms of form or purpose, and if they even have one. Within all of these minimalist queries, there is a direct wit and humor, which can’t always be said for this genre of visual art.

Through July 14, 303 Gallery (555 W. 21st St.).

More at: 303 Gallery









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