Aesthetic Post

Listening / Viewing: Jean-Michel Blais – Il

Directed by Dan & PAG.

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Away From His Hands: Ben Gorham for Frame

Frame founders Erik Torstensson and Jens Grede have teamed up with their friend Ben Gorham, the man behind Byredo, to design a menswear capsule collection. Gorham has beautifully expanded the Byredo name from a perfume house to include handsome leather goods and accessories, but this is his first go at ready-to-wear. The collection, “Away From His Hands,” was inspired by American rodeo culture and how youth have put a personal spin on traditional western wear. It makes sense, as Frame, conceived only in 2012, is a label rooted in denim; their effortless European cuts, bridged with ‘70s Los Angeles influence (where the garments are manufactured), makes for the perfect vehicle to deliver Gorham’s ideas.

The collection has some very recognizable Americana references, from patchwork jackets, to the Ford logo, but what makes the concept interesting is how the pieces coexist and meld into sportswear and modern fits, offering a unique, effortless perspective on what we might think of as western wear. 

Away From His Hands was photographed by Torstensson, modeled by singer A.Chal.

Available at: Frame

Tool Roots by Mike Abelson at Maison Hermès

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Tool Roots at Hermès Ginza

Postalco co-founder and designer Mike Abelson is the latest to oversee the window design at Hermès’ Ginza store in Tokyo. The display, titled Tool Roots, features a variety of tools and work objects arranged and broken down by their primary elements; Tool Roots is Ableson’s response to the Hermès 2017 theme of “Object Sense,” with 3-dimensional charts of daily objects mixed with drawings. The presentation is interwoven with Hermès products, and spans across two large display cases, as well as smaller feature boxes.

“Maybe tools are like colors? Perhaps they can be blended together, the way colors are, to form new objects with completely different roles?” says Abelson.

Tool Roots runs through July 11, 2017.

More at: Maison Hermès, Postalco
Photos: Mike Abelson

Listening / Viewing: Seramic – I Got You

Directed by Yagaboo.

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape by Diane Tuft

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

Photographed by acclaimed environmental fine art photographer Diane Tuft, The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape (published by Assouline) is a collection of images illustrating the alarming melt of the Arctic Circle. Tuft’s work is a direct look at climate change’s radical effect on a once pristine frozen landscape, now both haunting and unavoidably beautiful, from the North Pole, to mountain glaciers of Svalbard, Norway (an archipelago located 600 miles north of Norway’s northernmost point, where mountain glaciers would be undisturbed by humans), to the awe-inspiring icebergs and ice sheet of Greenland.

By the end of this century, it is predicted that the ocean will rise eight feet, causing the displacement of millions of people throughout the Earth. Ocean rise will be due to three factors: the melting of mountain glaciers, the thermal expansion of the ocean, and the melting of the Greenland ice sheet. Tuft’s visual record of this ruinous environment serves as a reminder to respect and understand the science of our ever-changing planet.

Diane Tuft specializes in infrared and ultraviolet photography, creating striking images that record what the naked eye cannot always see. Her travels to destinations where ultraviolet light is in excess result in otherworldly, vivid colors that are made possible by the surplus of this light, but also directly reflect the serious environmental imbalance.

More at: Assouline, Diane Tuft

“Beauty is whatever anyone thinks is beautiful.”

– Rei Kawakubo, founder of Comme de Garçons, who is being honored at The Met Costume Institute’s exhibition Rei Kawakubo/Comme de Garçons: Art of the In-Between, May 4 – September 4.

Forms in Space… by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans

Forms in Space... by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans

Forms in Space... by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans

Forms in Space... by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans

Cerith Wyn Evans’ installation, Forms in Space… by Light (in Time), at the Tate Britain’s Duveen Galleries, is an exploration of form and perspective via more than a mile of neon lighting; strict lines and graphic shapes of light are suspended from the ceiling, referencing physical and kinetic gestures.

At first glance, the almost chaotic nature of the installation is similar in visual style to “light writing,” a popular trend in art photography, however, as the viewer moves along the installation and perspective shifts, the uniform arrangement appears to be in motion. Structured in three parts that emerge from a single neon ring and develop into three disc forms, Wyn Evan’s implemented choreology – the practice of translating movement into notational form, and was influenced by the precise work of Japanese Noh theater, a gesture-based, highly-crafted performance art. The artist describes the three forms as “occulist witnesses,” a reference to artist Marcel Duchamp’s sculpture The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), which was donated to the Tate’s collection in 1975.

Best known for his use of neon lighting, the work of Welsh conceptual artist Cerith Wyn Evans ranges from experimental film, to installation, sculpture, photography, and text. Other light installations by Wyn Evans include E=V=E=N=T (2015), a sculpture commissioned for Malmo Live, and Arr/Dep (imaginary landscape for the birds) (2006), at Lufthansa’s Frankfurt headquarters.

Forms in Space… by Light (in Time) by Cerith Wyn Evans runs until August, 20 at Tate Britain, London.

More at: Tate Britain
Photos: Joe Humphreys © Tate

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

At 1,066 meters above sea level, the Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus, sits at the base of Hardangervidda – a large mountain plateau in central-southern Norway. The residence was designed by the architect for his own family, and is built into the landscape to avoid a strong contrast between new construction and the natural environment.

Since there is no road connection, building materials had to be flown in by helicopter or delivered via snow vehicle. The exterior is clad in pine, which will grey over time, further blending into the existing landscape. Designed to be used year-round, considerations had to be taken to protect the cabin from the harsh winter climate of Norway, specifically, exterior build features like the roof’s width, protect the house, and trafficked areas were specially placed to avoid snow accumulation. The house sits on a foundation of concrete pillars above the bedrock, and the immediate area was landscaped subtly to preserve the slow-growing alpine vegetation found at such altitudes.

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Oslo-based Aarhus’ minimal approach to the interior also makes use of pine throughout. The main area consists of a angled ceiling and a view-facing wall of glass, the space designed to suggest you are as outdoors as you are in, a reference to the gapahuk (the Norwegian version of a lean-to – a traditional, improvised hiking shelter).

With surprisingly sizable accommodations (thanks to built-in bunks), clever storage, and thoughtfully positioned windows, the Ustaoset Cabin offers all the comforts of home while taking full advantage of the great outdoors.

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

Ustaoset Cabin by Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus

More at: Jon Danielsen Aarhus
Photos: Knut Bry, Jon Danielsen Aarhus, Ruth Mjøen

Earth Day Conscious Gift Guide

The first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, brought to action 20 million Americans, and is widely credited with launching the modern environmental movement. The passage of the landmark Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act, and many other groundbreaking environmental laws soon followed. Twenty years later, Earth Day went global, mobilizing 200 million people in 141 countries, and lifting environmental issues onto the world stage. This April 22, the 47th anniversary of Earth Day, the mission is education; fluency in the concepts of climate change and threats to the environment is the key to action, from laws and policy, to business practices and personal actions.

While the best way to recognize the cause may be to avoid consuming altogether, it is possible to put your money where your mouth is when it comes to environment and sustainability-minded businesses and products. Here are a few selections that forgo standard profit models and support causes and ideas that align with the principles of Earth Day, or perhaps just a little something to remind us to care for the natural world we all require to thrive. 

 

1. The Plant magazine brings together photographers, illustrators, designers, musicians, writers, and visual artists from around the world to share their perceptions and experiences around plants.

. . . During photosynthesis, plants absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen. This opposite pattern of gas use makes plants and people natural partners. Houseplants can also remove toxins from air – up to 87 percent of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) every 24 hours, according to NASA research. VOCs include substances like formaldehyde (present in rugs, vinyl, cigarette smoke and grocery bags), and benzene and trichloroethylene (both found in man-made fibers, inks, solvents and paint).

2A design inspired by the the Danish concept of “hygge,” the Carrie LED lamp by Norm Architects is a lightweight, portable lamp that can be adapted for indoor or outdoor use, its bulb-free LED is powered by a rechargeable battery.

. . . LEDs are up to 80% more efficient than traditional lighting (fluorescent and incandescent); less energy use reduces the demand from power plants and decreases greenhouse gas emissions.

3. Birdhaus by Claesson Koivisto Rune is a subtle reinvention of the classic birdhouse; this numbered edition is made from 3D printed porcelain and produced by OTHR, a forward-thinking collaborative that allows designers to meld technology with heirloom-quality materials.

. . . OTHR’s production process avoids manufacturing more than is needed by implementing technologies such as 3D printing, this keeps waste to a minimum and the typical warehousing of merchandise is bypassed, directly minimizing environmental impact.

4. Made from 18-carat recycled yellow gold, and featuring a panel of grey-blue fossilized dinosaur bone, this ring by designer Monique Péan is a chic ode to both modern design and our planet’s history.

. . . Péan’s sustainability mission revolves around responsible sourcing (never using mined materials), and recycled metals for jewelry designs. In addition to forgoing the often destructive standards of the jewelry industry, Péan is dedicated to supporting global philanthropic organizations. To observe Earth Day, the brand donates a portion of proceeds to Trees for the Future, helping communities to alleviate poverty, affecting positive social change, and improving both local and global environments by working with farming communities along environmentally degraded and highly traveled trade corridors.

5. Peet Rivko’s Balancing Face Oil is a signature blend of organic avocado, jojoba, and prickly pear oils, rich in essential fatty acids and natural antioxidants.

. . . Peet Rivko use no toxic parabens, sulfates, phthalates, PEGs, phenoxyethanol, silicones, or petroleum in their formulations. They work hand-in-hand with suppliers to ensure the supply chains are transparent, and product formulas are manufactured in a wind-powered lab in Southern California. The brand opts for recyclable and biodegradable packaging, and containers are manufactured with sustainability in mind.

6. The Natural Resources Defense Counsel works to safeguard the earth—its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends. Founded in 1970, NRDC combines the power of more than two million members and online activists with the expertise of some 500 scientists, lawyers, and policy advocates across the globe to ensure the rights of all people to the air, the water, and the wild. Your donation is a direct way to sponsor hard-hitting cases and campaigns in defense of nature.

7. Matt & Nat’s Magistral Notepad Sleeve is a a revival of the classic leather notepad jacket with pencil holder, only this time in modern, vegan materials.

. . . The Mat & Nat brand started with a commitment to not using leather or any other animal-based material; their linings are made of 100% recycled plastic bottles, and they’ve recently introduced recycled bicycle tires to their collections.

8. Koval Organic Vodka is made from organic grain, sourced from local farmers and milled on site, for a complete grain-to-bottle product. 

. . . Organic farming eliminates the possibility of soil and water contamination by synthetic chemicals, preserves local wildlife, and encourages biodiversity. Local-sourcing equates to less energy used for transportation, directly reducing carbon dioxide emissions.

9. bkr’s 1L water bottle is the antidote to cheap, disposable plastic bottles; their glass design, sleeved in silicone, motivates you to drink your daily dose of water, without polluting the environment with wasteful plastic.

. . . For every six plastic water bottles used, only one makes it to the recycling bin, U.S. landfills are overflowing with 2 million tons of discarded water bottles alone.

10. Wool Runners by Allbirds are made from breathable, ZQ-certified Merino wool.

. . . ZQ certification ensures high standards of sustainable farming and animal welfare. The wool used requires 60% less energy to produce than typical synthetic materials used in shoes; castor beans are a sustainable source for the green polyurethane used for insoles, and the Allbirds shipping shoebox uses 40% less materials than traditional packaging.

Listening / Viewing: Coals – S.I.T.C.

Directed by Ola Bydlowska, Alan Willmann.









© 2017, Aesthetic Post