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Wing Photographs by Linden Gledhill

Linden Gledhill

Linden Gledhill

Linden Gledhill

Linden Gledhill

Without more information, the subject of this series of photographs by Linden Gledhill appears unidentifiable: complex metallic patterning and petal-like structure. Amazingly, the trained biochemist has captured the unique and endlessly fascinating details of butterfly and moth wings with macro photography; these very-close shots reveal the intricate, fragile patterns of the insect’s surface scales. With a remarkable range of color and texture, the images are not only inspiring, but eye-opening to the symmetry and otherworldly details of nature we might otherwise take for granted.

More at: Linden Gledhill

Omizubata N House by Iida Archiship Studio

Innovative Japanese architecture firm Iida Archiship Studio has built a strong reputation with modernist structures that are thoughtfully responsive to their surroundings. This example, the Omizubata N House, set within the forested town of Kauizawa, is a weekend retreat that, like Iida’s other work, gracefully balances elegance and minimalism, while taking its immediate environment into serious consideration.

Omizubata N HouseStacked concrete columns support an exaggerated, dissymmetrical roof that extends to create a wraparound veranda and significant outdoor space at the structure’s front. The house’s open-to-nature design is obvious, while still maintaining a good sense of order and just enough transparency.

Omizubata N House

Omizubata N HouseInside, the gabled-roof design allows for a double-height ceiling, as well as a lofted study.

Omizubata N HouseWood-clad finishing both references and communicates with the forested environment.

Omizubata N House

More at: Iida Archiship Studio
Photos: Iida Archiship Studio

Lighting by Lukas Peet

Lukas Peet is a Canadian designer who received his industrial design training at the prestigious Design Academy Eindhoven in the Netherlands. This year’s winner of Canada’s The Design Exchange Emerging Designer competition, Peet practices in several fields, receiving much recognition for his elegantly minimalist lighting designs.

Lukas Peet, Rudi

One of Peet’s most iconic designs is the Rudi series. Produced in collaboration with New York City-based manufacturer Roll & Hill, Rudi consists of bent metal tubes holding dimmable cold cathode lamps. The form resembles fine jewelry, and the light is suspended by its own cord, simply knotted at the top.

lukaspeetslab2

lukaspeetbutton1

A couple of Peet’s latest designs include Slab, a flat LED pendant, produced in a variety of surfaces (shown in felt), as well as Button, a tiltable LED pendant that hangs from a nylon rope through holes in the lamp itself, just like a button.

lukaspeetetable2

While Peet’s striking table lamps are only prototypes, their studied, timeless designs are certainly worth mentioning. Specular and Diffuse merge beauty and function; Specular, inspired by specular reflections and rays of light, illuminates both table surface and ceiling, without the blinding effect of a bare bulb. Diffuse, a smaller-scale lamp, is composed of a ceramic base and a simple mirrored bulb to produce a warm table or desktop glow.

With many outstanding lighting designers emerging of late, Lukas Peet is certainly one to keep an eye on. Though this is just a brief introduction to one facet of his work, Peet’s imaginative, but practical designs have a stamp and direction all their own.

More at: Lukas Peet Design

Blub Clock by Duncan Hellmers

Australian designer Duncan Hellmers has created a new way of telling time that blurs the lines of time itself. His Blub clock’s modernist but retro-evocative design consists of a solid anodized aluminum base that houses four glass Nixie (neon gas) bulbs displaying the time in a comforting, old-school fashion. An indicator at the front can be configured to flash with the seconds, glow continuously, or only during p.m. hours. In addition to the time, the device can also be shifted to modes that present the date or temperature.

More at: Blub Kickstarter

Design Classic: Nikon 28TI

With the trend of premium compact film cameras in the early 1990s, makers such as Contax, Minolta, and Ricoh were at the top of the movement with sturdily built models that featured prime lenses and more advanced features for photography enthusiasts. Nikon entered this market in 1993 with the 135 film autofocus 35Ti model, followed by the all-black 28Ti, a year later.

The name referring to its 28 mm f/2.8 Nikkor lens, and titanium body, the camera not only employed advanced Nikon technology and a premium lens, but a unique design that far exceeded the aesthetics of its competitors.

The 28Ti’s elegant, aerospace-quality titanium casing lends to the camera’s utilitarian appearance, in addition to being very strong and lightweight. The 28Ti’s most iconic and unique feature is the top plate that features an analog, watch-style series of gauges that inform the user of such details as focus distance, exposure compensation, and aperture. At a time when much cheaper to produce, LCD displays were the standard, these analog meters were a new way of employing classic mechanics to offer an intuitive, one-glance experience, not to mention the ability to operate the camera at waist level.

Often overlooked, but still regarded as one of the best compact cameras in both design and technology history, the 28Ti set standards for future models not only by Nikon, but other manufacturers. Unfortunately, its high price and slower operation speeds resulted in poor sales, leading to the camera’s discontinuation in 1998.

The 28Ti model is not entirely rare, and can still be found on the secondhand market, many still “new-in-box” condition; however, because of its design qualities, novelty features, and enduring strength as a relevant, exceptional camera, high prices are to be expected.

A good place to start: Nikon 28Ti on eBay

Ion Hotel

Outside of Reykjavik, very close to the Unesco World Heritage Site Thingvellir National Park, sits Iceland’s Ion Hotel. Billing itself as an “adventure hotel” the Ion’s location makes it perfect for exploring Iceland’s otherworldly geography, with access to hot springs, glaciers, and a perfect vantage to view the Northern Lights.

Designed by Minarc, the hotel is built with a prefabricated panel system, that not only incorporates recycled materials, but is designed to maximize energy efficiency. The architecture is perfectly suited the the lava fields and stark surroundings, and its suspended-by-pillar construction is an homage to Iceland’s first settler, Ingólfr Arnarson, who, according to legend, en route to Iceland in the year 847, threw his pillars overboard and sailed to where the gods took him ashore.

Hot springs provide geothermal heating, and extensive use of natural light minimizes the need for artificial. With just 46 rooms, a restaurant, and a spa, the hotel is full-service, but with a disconnected, aligned-with-nature approach. In addition to its subdued external appearance, Minarc has thoughtfully incorporated natural materials throughout the hotel, such as recycled wood furniture, lamps made from lava and found-wood, and indigenous birch wood details; in the rooms, images of Icelandic animals stylishly and minimally serve as wall art.

An immersive position in Iceland’s visually arresting wilderness, paired with the luxuries of excellent design, local food, and hotel comforts work together to create an experience that is not only sure to encourage relaxation and health, but an exploratory admiration of nature’s wonders.

More at: Ion Hotel

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

1. Papabubble Hard Candy, $15; 2. René Redzepi: A Work in Progress, $60; 3. Massimo Vignelli Clear Mug, $12; 4. Pat Kim’s Soap on a Rope, $16; 5. Binchotan Charcoal Toothbrush, $7

6. Acne Studios Pajama Shirt, $320; 7. A Lab on Fire Perfume, $110; 8. Gabriela Artigas Tusk Ring, $195;
9. Lite+Cycle Vetiver Pillar Candle, $36; 10.Takahiro Kurashima: Poemotion 1, $25

Perfume Architecture by Comme des Garçons

As a limited edition collection, Comme des Garçons has made-over three of their house fragrances: Wonderwood, CDG2, and Amazingreen. At the hands of Frédéric Couderc, master carpenter and one of the minds behind Comme des Garçons’ spaces, and artist Lindy Foss-Quillet, the iconic pebble-shaped bottle remains, but for this incarnation, is suspended in an industrial-style setting of metal and plexiglass.

$140, available online at Dover Street Market.

Plug Lamp by ateljé Lyktan

This smart and very practical design is a collaboration between Sweden’s Form Us With Love design studio and ateljé Lyktan. The aluminum base of the lamp incorporates an electrical outlet, a utilitarian concept that remedies the issue of congested or hard-to-reach wall-sockets. The lamp’s simple form and glass shade offer style without being obtrusive in any way. Depending on your location, the “Europlug”-style outlet can be converted at the wall, making the lamp itself a tabletop converter for imported equipment, or can simply be used with a direct-converter.

$250, available at Scandinavian Design Center

3D Sculptures by Eyal Gever

Eyal Gever, an artist with a history in 3D design and creation, explores disaster and motion through his impressive sculptures. Composed of hanging, multiple layers, that include subtleties like depth and shadow, the sculptures make for a dimensional, remarkably realistic effect. This static translation of cataclysmic events results in a sense of peace and an unexpected beauty in stillness. Gever’s work includes sculptural depictions of a nuclear bomb, a large-scale smoke cloud, and a street explosion, among his other work that plays with form, sudden movement and destruction, as well as material.

More at: Eyal Gever









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