Aesthetic Post

All The Time by Sue Tompkins / The Modern Institute Glasgow

Sue Tompkins - All the Time

Sue Tompkins - All the Time

Sue Tompkins - All the Time

Sue Tompkins - All the Time

Sue Tompkins - All the Time

Glasgow-based Sue Tompkins’ 6th solo exhibition, All the Time, at The Modern Institute (Glasgow) is based around the artist’s interpretation of language through abstractions; from speech, to words and gestures, Tompkins recontextualizes fragments of conversation through a cadence of pattern and vivid color, as well as the occasional random word, sound, or letter. Tompkins uses her hands to paint the canvas, offering a gestural expression of rhythm, a visual rhythm echoed by the gallery arrangement that includes equally vague polaroid photographs that hint at the communications, suggesting memories or scraps of a particular message. 

Sue Tompkins, b. 1971, graduated from the Glasgow School of Art in 1994, and has been involved in exhibitions and performances worldwide.

Through January 19, 2019, The Modern Institute, 14—20 Osborne Street, Glasgow.

More at: The Modern Institute

Listening / Viewing: Broods – Everything Goes (Wow)

Directed by Sam Kristofski.

Nihon Noir by Tom Blachford

Nihon Noir by Tom Blachford
Nihon Noir by Tom Blachford
Nihon Noir by Tom Blachford

Photographer Tom Blachford’s latest series of evocative photographs, Nihon Noir, explores Tokyo’s brutalist architecture after dark, in all of its glowing, sci-fi glory. The name Nihon Noir is a nod to the Neon Noir film genre that includes the specific aesthetically-driven films such as Blade Runner and the work of Nicolas Winding-Refn (Drive, The Neon Demon, Only God Forgives), “Nihon” (pronounced Nee-Honn) referring to Japan as a nation. 

The series commenced with the work of modernist architect Kenzo Tange, and extends to other buildings that embody his Metabolist philosophy, which intends to combine brutalism with the principles of organic growth. Though the images are devoid of faces, they imply a mysterious life energy, and while the buildings may be old, when so distinctively captured in this parallel universe, they read as futuristic.

More at: Tom Blachford

Listening / Viewing: Friendly Fires – Heaven Let Me In

Directed by BISON.

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

From contemporary architects such as David Chipperfield and Tadao Ando, to twentieth-century masters including Marcel Breuer and Le Corbusier, Phaidon’s Atlas of Brutalist Architecture is a geographically-organized collection of nearly 900 brutalist buildings, a number of which are no longer standing. Presented in an oversized format, the book contains 1000 duotone photographs documenting the “graphic strength, emotional power, and compelling architectural presence” of the oft-polarizing Brutalist style, across over 100 countries. Including a brief on each building’s history and design intention, the structure’s condition, use, and status is also identified through the use of a clever atlas-style key.

More at Phaidon.

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Designed to provide accommodation for participants in the annual International Garden Festival, and when not in season, to be used by architecture students from the Université Laval, Résidence des Stagiaires by Quebec City-based Atelier Pierre Thibault is a minimalist, double-structured guest house on the 45-acre nature preserve, Jardins de Métis, along the Saint Lawrence Seaway in rural Quebec.

The residence consists of two gabled buildings, connected by an outdoor terrace, but separated by function. The main structure contains the communal kitchen, dining, and living areas, with a mezzanine study, thoughtfully floored with open slats, allowing light to travel throughout the space. The utilitarian, exposed-wood interiors reflect the organic nature of the buildings’ exterior, with knotty and natural finish wood planks making up the floors, walls, and even furniture, all executed by local woodworker Gervais Pineau.

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

In the sleeping building, with bunks on the first floor, and additional beds tucked into the roof’s eaves, glass doors and windows offer perfectly framed views of the surrounding nature. 

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

The estate at Jardins de Métis opened to the public in 1962, the main residence converted to a museum. It hosts The International Garden Festival, an event started in 2000, which involves architects and designers creating temporary structures and installations amongst the lush natural surroundings.

More at: Atelier Pierre Thibault
Photos: Maxime Brouillet and Laurence Gaudette

Listening / Viewing: Sam Fender – Dead Boys

Directed by Vincent Haycock.

Nebl by Studio Rem

Nebl by Studio Rem

Nebl by Studio Rem

Nebl by Studio Rem

Nebl by Studio Rem

Nebl by Studio Rem

Designed by Berlin-based Studio Rem for Danish brand Gejst, Nebl (a stylized version of the German word for fog), is an innovative planter inspired by the atmospheric condition.

A meditative focal point to house your indoor specimens, Nebl consists of a ceramic base, and a matte, frosted glass capsule-like dome that rests on top, the design offering an elegantly mysterious illusion of the plant inside being enveloped in fog. The glass element is designed with two opening sizes, allowing it to be inverted and placed at a lower or higher position. Nebl is available with a grey or black base, in two sizes (94, €201).

More at: Gejst
Photos: Studio Rem

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed is the work of Echo Park (Los Angeles)-based Cactus Store. A specific book with broad appeal, Xerophile is a compilation of over five hundred photographs of rare and unusual plants, taken over 80 years by both professional and amateur enthusiasts. Somewhere between photography book and reference guide, Xerophile’s minimalist format includes full-page photos with simple captions of the specimen’s botanical name, location of photograph, and in many cases, fine points about the plant. Not simply a book for cacti-lovers, Xerophile explores the diversity of these dry condition plants and how they are just one small aspect of the planet’s flora, speaking to the adventurer and the curious.

From the geographic climates one might expect, and reaching as far as Somalia and the Galápagos Islands, the book explores the oft-overlooked plants that thrive in places remote, exotic, and sometimes unexpected. The admirer’s journey to capture these Xerophiles, a word from the Greek xeros (dry), and philos (loving), is inspiring, and 30 pages are dedicated to interviews and insight.

More at: Hat & Beard Press

Listening / Viewing: So Blue – Tales

Directed by Rory Pippan & Luke Franceschini.









© 2017, Aesthetic Post