The Aesthetic Post


Piece in Brief: VP Globe by Verner Panton (Anniversary Edition)

VP Globe by Verner Panton

VP Globe by Verner Panton

VP Globe by Verner Panton

Created by Danish designer Verner Panton in 1969, the VP Globe pendant lamp is an icon of Panton’s playful, yet sophisticated Space Age style. In designing the piece, Panton looked at the technical aspects of light and materials, his final composition consisting of a shielded bulb that reflects light and color onto internal discs, creating an indirect glow from inside a clear globe. 

Available in two sizes, the globe itself is made of transparent acrylic, the heart is composed of a series of reflectors, available in lacquered aluminum or opal glass, suspended inside by three metal chains. To mark the 90th anniversary of Verner Panton’s birth, Verpan released a special edition brass variation of the design, with the classic reflector detail in red and blue.

Verpan, the licensed production brand behind Panton’s designs, in collaboration with Frandsen Lighting, produce the Globe lamps in in Denmark. Working closely with the designer’s widow Marianne Panton and her family, Verpan ensures that the integrity of Panton’s distinguished designs remain intact.

One of the most influential designers of the 20th-century, Panton created innovative and often futuristic designs in a variety of materials, but may be best known for his use of plastics, in vibrant and unexpected colors. His lighting career started by designing lamps for Louis Poulsen, and he went on to create many exemplary mid-century lighting designs, in addition to furniture and entire “environments.”

Vintage models of the VP Globe design can be found online at 1stDibs, new models, including the brass variation ($2935), are available via Verpan distributors, such as YLighting.

More at: Verpan
Photos: Verpan

Island Songs by Ólafur Arnalds

Over the course of 7 weeks, as part of a project titled Island Songs, Icelandic composer and musician Ólafur Arnalds has arranged to collaborate with local artists across Iceland to create and perform a song each week, and release the audio and a video performance online (shot by director Balvin Z).

Arnalds comments: “I always want to make everything sound perfect, but I also know that perfection doesn’t necessarily make for good music. So these projects grew out of an internal fight with myself, a need to create something spontaneous and improvised.”

The real-time, traveling project can be followed at islandsongs.is, new songs are released every Monday. Here is the video of Arnalds’ latest Island Songs piece, Raddir, a collaboration with father and son, Hilmar Örn Agnarsson and Georg Kári Hilmarsson, featuring the South Iceland Chamber Choir.


Review: u-Jays On-Ear Headphones

U-Jays Headphones

U-Jays Headphones

U-Jays Headphones

u-Jays headphones are the result of two years research and development, with an emphasis on simplicity in design, balanced sound, and comfort, by the Stockholm-based audio brand Jays. The on-ear, closed-back design steps up Jays’ game, and places these headphones in the premium category, with their handsome, minimal form, based on ultra-durable construction. The form factor and matte-finishing put them right up there as some of the best looking headphones on the market; they aren’t flashy, but definitely read as smart design.

u-Jays are boxed with the exchangeable (available in limited metal finishes) ear cups detached, setup being very simple. They come in just under 8oz, and are built on a spring steel and wire core with integrated screws; because of this solid design, they do not completely fold, but the ear cups are capable of folding 90 degrees, allowing the headphones to fit perfectly into the included carrying bag. The viscoelastic ear cushions are designed to adapt to the shape of the wearer’s ears for a close fit without sound escape, and while this design is effective, like most on-ear headphones, they become slightly uncomfortable after some time worn; this might be because u-Jays clamp more to the wearer’s head than they rest on the ears. A rubber, slim-profile headband is comfortable on the head or when resting headphones on the neck, but the material choice is bit of a magnet for dust. A detachable audio cord is available for iOS, Windows, or Android systems, and includes a MEMS technology microphone and three-button remote. Technically speaking, the speakers consist of a 40mm Japanese-silk diaphragm dynamic speaker with a sensitivity of 100 dB, SPL @1 kHz, 32 Ohm @ 1 kHz of impedance and frequency response of 10 to 20,000 Hz.  For a richer bass response and air flow, they are surrounded by vent holes covered with acoustic tuning filters.

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Listening / Viewing: The Magician – Shy

Directed by Bob Jeusette (CAVIAR).

Duotone Series by YIELD

Duotone by YIELD

Duotone by YIELD

Duotone by YIELD

Duotone is the latest series of furniture from design studio YIELD. A modular hardware system that pairs sturdy construction with the effect of visual lightness, Duotone is available in a range of configurations, juxtaposing materials such as glass, leather, and wood, with a frame of powder-coated aluminum or solid brass. The furniture can be flat-packed for easy shipping, and assembly is simple, based on a snap-in hardware system.

Each piece is made locally in the coastal town of St. Augustine, Florida, the oldest European settlement in the United States, where YIELD is based.

More at: YIELD

Olafur Eliasson’s Waterfall at Versailles

Olafur Eliasson, Waterfall

Olafur Eliasson, Waterfall

Olafur Eliasson, Waterfall

As part of the Palace of Versailles’ annual contemporary art exhibition, artist Olafur Eliasson’s works are installed across the grounds, engaging visitors in a variety of ways. Eliasson, known for his large-scale installations that explore light, perception, and environmental issues, introduces unexpected experiences to Versailles, without interfering with the historic layout or landscape.

Perhaps the most striking installation is Waterfall, a monumental fountain that simulates the action of a waterfall and recalls his previous waterfall series in New York City. Viewed from front, the outpour of water appears to come from mid-air, cascading into the Grand Canal. A latticed tower of yellow steel girders provides the feature’s base; the installation is partly influenced by 15th-16th century French monarch Louis XIV’s landscape architect André Le Notre, who had planned an ambitious water feature for the garden that was never realized.

“This waterfall reinvigorates the engineering ingenuity of the past,” said Eliasson. “It is as constructed as the court was, and I’ve left the construction open for all to see – a seemingly foreign element that expands the scope of human imagination.”

Eliasson approached the château and gardens of Versailles as a site for experimentation, and all of the pieces exhibited were conceived specifically for the site. Other outdoor installations, where the theme is water, include Fog Assembly, which envelopes viewers in ring of mist, and Glacial Rock Flour Garden, introducing the residue of retracting glaciers to the grounds. Inside, mirrors and light are used to create effects and encourage visitor interaction, such as the piece titled Solar Compression, where a mirror glows with a thin rim of light, or The Curious Museum, where large-scale trompe l’oeil effects are created through reflections.

“The Versailles that I have been dreaming up is a place that empowers everyone,” said Eliasson. “It invites visitors to take control of the authorship of their experience instead of simply consuming and being dazzled by the grandeur.”

“It asks them to exercise their senses, to embrace the unexpected, to drift through the gardens, and to feel the landscape take shape through their movement.”

The exhibition is on display until October 30th, 2016, in Versailles, France.

More at: Olafur Elliason
Photos: Anders Sune Berg

Listening / Viewing: LANY – Where The Hell Are My Friends

Directed by Nadia Marquard Otzen.

Maison Kitsuné AW16 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

Maison Kitsuné Fall 2016 Menswear

As the weather grows hotter and hotter outside, it is a nice time to look forward to cool fall air, as well as the wardrobe that comes along with . . . 

Maison Kitsuné’s A/W 2016 collection, Love Rises, takes Japanese imagery head-on; Kitsuné’s bridge between Tokyo and Paris could not be more evident in this collection, as cofounders Gildas Loaëc and Kuroki Masaya found inspiration in the Hayao Miyazaki film The Wind Rises.

Mt. Fuji, sculpted Niwaki trees, and the rising sun all make graphic appearances, lending a retro feel to the pieces, still narrowly avoiding a cartoon or brand-centric vibe; less directly-themed garments, especially jackets of unexpected fabric choices and patchwork, are reminiscent of Comme des Garçons, and feature cuts that elegantly reference Japanese tradition.

With Love Rises, Kitsuné so beautifully takes it one notch further than the idea; one step ahead of an already-done Japanese theme, one ahead of preppy, and surely one ahead for the brand.

Photos: Pierpaolo Ferrari
More at: Maison Kitsuné

Drill Lamps by LeviSarha

Drill Lamps by LeviSarha

Drill Lamps by LeviSarha

Drill Lamps by LeviSarha

Drill Lamps by LeviSarha

For the Milan Furniture Fair, DAMN° magazine invited Belgian designers Levi Dethier and Sarha Duquesne, creative studio LeviSarha, to be part of the exhibition “A Matter of Perception: Tradition & Technology.” For the event, LeviSarha designed two table lamps called Drill, a reference to the process and material from which the lamps are made; the designs are artfully composed of cylinders that were extracted from blocks of basalt, the volcanic stone readily found in the southeast of Belgium, making for a harmonious balance of the natural igneous material and functional technology.

More at: LeviSarha

Life House by John Pawson / Living Architecture

Life House by John Pawson

Life House by John Pawson

Life House by John Pawson

Amidst the rolling hills of the Welsh countryside, Living Architecture commissioned architect John Pawson to create a house of serenity and beauty – Life House (or Tŷ Bywyd, as it is called in Welsh). The house serves as a retreat that can sleep up to six people, with the architectural and design intention of contemplation and restoration for its guests.

John Pawson is a master of working within the parameters of landscape, ecology, and historic importance; his portfolio is filled with minimalist homes, boutiques, and even religious spaces. Working in collaboration with philosopher and writer, as well as the founder of Living Architecture, Alain de Botton, Pawson’s approach to Life House was an uncompromisingly modern design where it would be possible to inhabit a different sort of architectural space. Luxurious in its carefully executed simplicity, the house has been influenced by Japanese design, as well as the architecture of Benedictine monks. To further inspire mental awareness and tranquility, a sequence of walks have been curated the artist Hamish Fulton.

“In this house I wanted to create a modern, secular retreat, where guests can experience the benefits of introspection, solitude, and immersion in nature,” said Pawson.

Life House by John Pawson

Life House by John Pawson

Life House by John Pawson

From the handmade Danish bricks (black on the exterior, pale grey inside), to the polished terrazzo floor, and Douglas-fir ceilings, the house’s materials and finishes were chosen for their calming and clean nature.

Life House’s floorpan is organized around two corridors that meet at a right angle: one “dark,” leading to a chamber built into the hillside, a cavernous space designed for contemplation, the other, “light,” leads to an outdoor space where the exercise of purifying the mind is also encouraged. A combined kitchen, dining area, and lounge serve as the central hub, with a layout to satisfy both complete privacy, and when it is desired, sociability and communion.

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