The Aesthetic Post


Weekend Music: Hundred Waters – Out Alee

Directed by Michael Langan.

COS x MR PORTER SS15 Collection

COS X MR PORTER

COS X MR PORTER

COS X MR PORTER

COS X MR PORTER

COS X MR PORTER

MR PORTER isn’t a stranger to collaborations (Levi’s, Acne Studios, to name a couple), but their latest Spring/Summer 2015 collection with COS might be their most interesting. COS’ fairly-priced Scandinavian cool meets function designs are a smart fit for MR PORTER, and this pairing certainly introduces some nicely architectural garments to the MR PORTER catalogue.

The 23-piece collection, described as having the “modern traveller” in mind, consists of wardrobe staples from lightweight knits to structured outwear, prices ranging from around $50 to $300.

Available at MR PORTER and select COS stores.

Weekend Music: Wild Beasts – Palace

Directed by Alex Turvey.

Dipseas by Sunski

Dipsea by Sunski Sunglasses

If you’re in the market for new sunglasses this summer, you probably know that the task of finding the perfect pair can be daunting. Obviously, it is a good idea to invest in sunglasses that are well made and agreeably styled; the all-too-common philosophy of “cheap sunglasses are as good as any” is a poor approach to something that you use daily, that actually serve a function to protect your eyes. This is where Sunski comes in; their latest model, Dipsea (shown above in Black Gold), is named after the hiking trail in Northern California, and manages to fit all of the criteria of an excellent pair, without breaking the bank.

Combining shiny polarized lenses with a lightweight, matte-finish frame, Dipseas looks more like a vintage shop find than a trendy accessory you’ll see on every third person; and with a build quality that rivals models two or three times the price, they’re a real bargain. It’s not everyday that you find a pair of sunglasses that look as good with a suit as they do a wetsuit, Dipseas pass that test.

$55, available at Sunski

Husarö House by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Husarö House is a project by Swedish firm Tham & Videgård Arkitekter, located in the outer Stockholm archipelago; in this pine-forested location, the house sits on an open space of natural bedrock and faces the sea to the north.

Husarö House

Husarö House

Husarö House

The house’s exterior is clad with folded black sheet metal and three sliding doors with one-step access to outdoor areas.

Husarö House

Husarö House

Layout-wise, the house is arranged into two floors, a social area at the ground floor, and private spaces upstairs.

The sliding windows/doors take advantage of views and allow for maximum light to enter the space. Upstairs, a skylight that runs along the roof’s ridge makes for a light and airy space that also feels cocooned by the walls of the pitched roof.

Husarö House

Husarö House

Though the all-wood interior trend is full-force, it isn’t always executed as precisely and beautifully as this construction demonstrates. From glulam beams to plywood sheet walls and knotty flooring, the interior finishing is thoughtful and seamless, albeit minimal.

More at: Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Pool Series by Kristen Martincic

Kristen Martincic Pools

Kristen Martincic Pools

Kristen Martincic Pools

Missouri-based artist Kristen Martincic produced this handsome series of pool images that are beautifully dimensional and play on her fascination with water; in Martincic’s words: “I have been working with traditional print media and a hybrid of print, drawing and painting on panel to investigate this. These mixed media works bend water, ladders, diving boards around the panel’s side, moving two-dimensional image to object. They simplify and compress space and invite the viewer to reconsider what lies beneath the surface of the familiar.”

More at: Kristen Martincic

Weekend Music: Shura – 2Shy

Directed by David M. Helman.

Leica M-P Safari Edition

Leica M-P Safari

Leica M-P Safari
Leica can be hit-or-miss with their special edition cameras, but the recently released Safari edition of the M-P (Typ 240) sure is a looker.

Leica’s Safari style dates back to 1960, when the M1 ‘Olive’ was introduced, initially made for military and field use. By marrying heritage and first-class technology, the latest Safari model remains elegant (you’ll notice no signature red dot on the front, but an engraved script on the top plate), and built to unparalleled standards.

The Safari edition set is limited to 1500 worldwide, which include a Summicron-M 35mm lens, leather strap, and card wallet. At nearly $10k this certainly isn’t an everyman’s camera, but if you’re in the market to invest, this model in a class of its own, and it is also worth noting that sold as a kit, it actually offers a savings as compared to purchasing the standard model and lens; otherwise, it sure is nice to look at.

More at: Leica

Elements Lighting by Note Design Studio

Elements by Note Design Studio

Elements by Note Design Studio

Elements by Note Design Studio

Swedish design studio Note have just debuted a new series of lighting inspired by the Nordic mountains and its light, Elements. The lamps range from floor to pendant, and are available in a number of subdued colors, incorporating textiles from Danish house Kvadrat. With a simple but thoughtfully formed fabric shade, the lamps are designed to cast a gentle light, reminiscent of a warm dawn, dusk, or midnight sun: perfect for long, dark Nordic days.

More at: Note Design Studio

Down the Long Driveway, You’ll See It

Down the long driveway, you'll see

“Down the long driveway, you’ll see it” isn’t the shortest title, but it does perfectly fit the content of this beautiful new book from photographer Mary Gaudin (with text by Matthew Arnold).

There are plenty of books dedicated to modern and mid-century architecture, but few approach the subject with such a human format.

Across New Zealand exist many modernist gems, and Mary focuses not necessarily on the lines or design influence, but the actual life of these homes. The architecture serves as a frame for real places where people spend their days and lives, perhaps not always with the polish of a Dwell editorial, but embracing a style of architecture that represents a new and better way of home life.

These houses also reflect their environment, and it is fascinating to see how, often seamlessly, they are incorporated into New Zealand’s natural landscape. One great example is the Einhorn House, which backs onto the Karori Bird Sanctuary, leaving the owners with glimpses of the rare Hihi bird feeding in their garden.

As for the title, it comes from an e-mail that homeowner Bruce Martin sent giving directions to his home, a reminder that an important house isn’t always a monument, but a place someone lives.

Down the long driveway, you'll see it

Down the long driveway, you'll see it

Down the long driveway, you'll see it

Down the long driveway, you'll see it

Down the long driveway, you'll see it

Photography: Mary Gaudin
More at/purchase: downthelongdriveway.com