Aesthetic Post

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

From contemporary architects such as David Chipperfield and Tadao Ando, to twentieth-century masters including Marcel Breuer and Le Corbusier, Phaidon’s Atlas of Brutalist Architecture is a geographically-organized collection of nearly 900 brutalist buildings, a number of which are no longer standing. Presented in an oversized format, the book contains 1000 duotone photographs documenting the “graphic strength, emotional power, and compelling architectural presence” of the oft-polarizing Brutalist style, across over 100 countries. Including a brief on each building’s history and design intention, the structure’s condition, use, and status is also identified through the use of a clever atlas-style key.

More at Phaidon.

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Designed to provide accommodation for participants in the annual International Garden Festival, and when not in season, to be used by architecture students from the Université Laval, Résidence des Stagiaires by Quebec City-based Atelier Pierre Thibault is a minimalist, double-structured guest house on the 45-acre nature preserve, Jardins de Métis, along the Saint Lawrence Seaway in rural Quebec.

The residence consists of two gabled buildings, connected by an outdoor terrace, but separated by function. The main structure contains the communal kitchen, dining, and living areas, with a mezzanine study, thoughtfully floored with open slats, allowing light to travel throughout the space. The utilitarian, exposed-wood interiors reflect the organic nature of the buildings’ exterior, with knotty and natural finish wood planks making up the floors, walls, and even furniture, all executed by local woodworker Gervais Pineau.

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

In the sleeping building, with bunks on the first floor, and additional beds tucked into the roof’s eaves, glass doors and windows offer perfectly framed views of the surrounding nature. 

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Résidence des Stagiaires by Atelier Pierre Thibault

The estate at Jardins de Métis opened to the public in 1962, the main residence converted to a museum. It hosts The International Garden Festival, an event started in 2000, which involves architects and designers creating temporary structures and installations amongst the lush natural surroundings.

More at: Atelier Pierre Thibault
Photos: Maxime Brouillet and Laurence Gaudette

Listening / Viewing: Sam Fender – Dead Boys

Directed by Vincent Haycock.

Nebl by Studio Rem

Nebl by Studio Rem

Nebl by Studio Rem

Nebl by Studio Rem

Nebl by Studio Rem

Nebl by Studio Rem

Designed by Berlin-based Studio Rem for Danish brand Gejst, Nebl (a stylized version of the German word for fog), is an innovative planter inspired by the atmospheric condition.

A meditative focal point to house your indoor specimens, Nebl consists of a ceramic base, and a matte, frosted glass capsule-like dome that rests on top, the design offering an elegantly mysterious illusion of the plant inside being enveloped in fog. The glass element is designed with two opening sizes, allowing it to be inverted and placed at a lower or higher position. Nebl is available with a grey or black base, in two sizes (94, €201).

More at: Gejst
Photos: Studio Rem

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed

Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed is the work of Echo Park (Los Angeles)-based Cactus Store. A specific book with broad appeal, Xerophile is a compilation of over five hundred photographs of rare and unusual plants, taken over 80 years by both professional and amateur enthusiasts. Somewhere between photography book and reference guide, Xerophile’s minimalist format includes full-page photos with simple captions of the specimen’s botanical name, location of photograph, and in many cases, fine points about the plant. Not simply a book for cacti-lovers, Xerophile explores the diversity of these dry condition plants and how they are just one small aspect of the planet’s flora, speaking to the adventurer and the curious.

From the geographic climates one might expect, and reaching as far as Somalia and the Galápagos Islands, the book explores the oft-overlooked plants that thrive in places remote, exotic, and sometimes unexpected. The admirer’s journey to capture these Xerophiles, a word from the Greek xeros (dry), and philos (loving), is inspiring, and 30 pages are dedicated to interviews and insight.

More at: Hat & Beard Press

Listening / Viewing: So Blue – Tales

Directed by Rory Pippan & Luke Franceschini.

Flooded Modernity by Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen

Flooded Modernity by Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen

Flooded Modernity by Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen

Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen has sunk a 1:1 replica of one of Le Corbusier‘s most iconic buildings, Villa Savoye, in a Danish fjord; this jutting, iceberg-like installation serves as a social and political statement pertaining to Brexit and Trump’s election results. Titled Flooded Modernity, the installation is one of 10 waterborne works on display at the Floating Art Festival on Vejle Fjord, an art and architecture event organized by the Vejle Museum in Denmark, available to view through September 2.

Havsteen-Mikkelsen describes Flooded Modernity as a symbol of how the values of modernism have been overwhelmed by technology; from election scandals to third party influence, across the world we’ve seen politics manipulated negatively and falsely via technology. As it relates to the installation, Havsteen-Mikkelsen describes Villa Savoye as a symbol of modernity that represents faith in the public’s critical thinking . . . “after these scandals, I think our sense of democracy and the public sphere has been distorted through the new use of digital technologies to manipulate elections. Our sense of modernity has been ‘flooded’. I sense the need to ‘re-state’ our political institutions – because our old ones have ‘sunk’.’”

Le Corbusier was a pioneer of the modernist movement in architecture of the early 1900s, the Swiss-French architect (amongst many other titles) rejected superfluous, ornamental design, in favor of clean lines and open plans, heavily inspired by mathematical concepts, his design theory having major impact on modern European architecture. Le Corbusier’s connection to water is of note when it comes to this installation; he praised the design of ocean liners and incorporated elements to his work, a barge built by Le Corbusier as a homeless shelter in 1910 sank earlier this year (and is to be restored as a museum) in Paris, and sadly, after going for a swim against his doctor’s orders, Le Corbusier drowned in the Mediterranean Sea off the southern coast of France in 1965.

Villa Savoye has been a returning theme in Havsteen-Mikkelsen’s work, as he considers it to embody the essential values of modernism, including critical thinking and reason.

More at: Asmund Havsteen-Mikkelsen

Courtyard at Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

Yamaguchi Sake Brewery by CASE-REAL

As part of a renovation of the Yamaguchi Sake Brewery in Kurume, Japan, firm CASE-REAL took an organic approach to connecting existing structures with a minimalist courtyard. Creating a meditative space in clean finishes, with the installation of cement floors and stairs, and re-imagining the large lounge space, result in a more fluid connection between the architecture that represents the brewery’s history. The traditional Japanese property was built in the early 1800s; paired with a modern approach, the spaces are elevated, but still reflective of the traditional methods employed in the rice-milling and brewing process.

More at: CASE-REAL
Photos:  Hiroshi Mizusaki

Amisol by Daniel Rybakken for Luceplan

Amisol by Daniel Rybakken

Amisol by Daniel Rybakken

Amisol by Daniel Rybakken

The Amisol pendant lamp by Norwegian designer Daniel Rybakken (for Luceplan), is an exercise in proportion, intended for a large space without taking up excessive spacial real estate. At 43 inches across, a translucent film or metallic mirror shade is stretched in a circular frame to provide solar projection, either diffusing or reflecting the direct beam of a high-intensity LED bulb; adjustable to varying angles, thin aluminum rods hold the disc in place.

More at: Luceplan

Release 02 by WARDROBE.NYC

Release 2 by Wardrobe.NYC

Release 2 by Wardrobe.NYC

Release 2 by Wardrobe.NYC

Release 2 by Wardrobe.NYC

Release 2 by Wardrobe.NYC

WARDROBE.NYC is a direct-to-consumer online venture by Josh Goot and Christine Centenera. The brand delivers urban minimalist clothing sets for men and women that forgo the often flawed fashion industry by focusing on quality and thoughtful design, as well as avoiding retail margins. Their pieces are designed in New York City and made in Italy, consolidated as a wardrobe collection, and available only as a single purchase.

Their latest release, Sport, is available in 5 ($500) or 10 ($1000) piece sets, and features a selection of modern but perennial performance basics (WARDROBE.NYC’s first release, Tailored, was based in more formal closet staples), as well as a limited edition Yung-1 sneaker by adidas Originals. The lack of visible branding or colorways stands true with the company’s “anti-fast fashion” ethos, guaranteeing an exceptionally made, stylish investment that goes against the consumption cycle specific to the retail fashion system.

“Our experience in the industry has lead us to think about a better and more egalitarian way to practice the elements of design and communication that we love, and at the same time, improve the business model so that it’s more efficient and less wasteful.” 

More at: Wardrobe.NYC









© 2017, Aesthetic Post