The Aesthetic Post


“Every” Lamp Collection by Arnout Meijer

Every Lamp Collection by Arnout Meijer

Every Lamp Collection by Arnout Meijer

Every Lamp Collection by Arnout Meijer

Every Lamp Collection by Arnout Meijer

Every Lamp Collection by Arnout Meijer

Every Lamp Collection by Arnout Meijer

Every Lamp Collection by Arnout Meijer

Every Lamp Collection by Arnout Meijer

At this year’s Salone del Mobile in Milan, Dutch designer Arnout Meijer presented his Every Cone, Every Torus, and Every Cylinder collection of lamps.

These lamps encapsulate a light shape that changes depending on your position; light vectors are refracted by the specialized acrylic shade, and rendered in relation to your eye. Where a traditional hologram reproduces a physical object as a virtual duplicate, this hybrid between the actual and virtual makes for the projection of intangible shapes.

“I focus on light because I think it is intriguing that light relates to both science and art. On one hand light is very pragmatic and fundamental in our daily lives, on the other hand, light has a very strong seductive power. My fascination for optical physics and digital technology is mostly the starting point for creating my works. I believe that the manipulation of optics can cause an abstruse and therefore surprising effect on the spectator. The outcomes are not only light fixtures, but sculptures and installations as well. Therefore the context of my work can be a self initiated objects as industrial collaborations, light is always the raw material,” – Arnout Meijer.

More at: Arnout Meijer Studio
Photos: Pim Top

Weekend Listening / Viewing: Tame Impala – Let It Happen

Directed by David Wilson.

CD Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

CB Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

CB Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

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CB Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

CB Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

CB Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

CB Poolhouse by Marc Merckx

CD Poolhouse is the work of Belgian designer and architect Marc Merckx. The elegant, simple architecture is dark and spare, but still airy, reflecting Merckx’s design philosophy: “a constant search for the perfect balance between proportions, materials, and space.” With a black timber facade, the building extends to the pool via a black steel pergola. Inside, Merckx’s custom furniture designs, natural materials, and a minimal color palette connect the indoors to out.

Photography via Marc Merckx
More at: Marc Merckx

Ripples Marble Tray by Objetto

Marble Tray by Objetto

Marble Tray by Objetto

Marble Tray by Objetto

Over the past couple of years, marble has made a notable return to interiors; from completely outfitted kitchens and baths, to fine sculptural design objects. Perhaps no better way to employ a dose of marble is the marble tray, and while there are many on the market (including the arrangement I use daily from Ladies and Gentleman Studio, or perhaps a more cost effective alternative from CB2), this design by Nils Van Brabant for Belgian firm Objetto, may be the most quietly elegant of all.

Ripples Marble Tray is produced using a carving technique that is unique to one craftsman, Hector Alvarado, a Mexican sculptor based in Indonesia; the tray’s indentures simulate small ripples on water, leaving you with an object that is both a piece of minimal art, as well as practical for use.

Ripples Marble Tray is available through Objetto, at just over $200.

Weekend Listening / Viewing: Yumi Zouma – Alena

Directed by Allie Avital Tsypin.

Mod Collection by Mae Engelgeer

Studio Mae Engelgeer

Studio Mae Engelgeer

Studio Mae Engelgeer

Amsterdam-based textile artist Mae Engelgeer recently released her Mod collection, a series of household textiles, such as blankets and tea towels, identified by graphic patterns and subtle color gradients.

Engelgeer designs textile pieces that are both functional and serve as interior art; made from highest-quality materials, most of Engelgeer’s designs are produced at the TextielLab in Tilburg, a specialized creative workshop for the manufacture of unique fabrics.

More at: Studio Mae Engelgeer
Pieces for purchase at: Magasin Mae

Bringing Green Inside with Yard Etc.

Yard Etc. / photo by The Aesthetic Post

Yard Etc. / photo by The Aesthetic Post

This warm season, many city dwellers wont be afforded the opportunity to reap the benefits of working in the garden; from the meditative time spent with nature, to the responsibility of nurturing living things, the very act of gardening has been proven to improve quality of life, but isn’t an option for all of us. Be it houseplants, fresh-cut flowers and farmers’ market produce, or simply what you wash your hands with, perhaps bringing more “green” inside is the best way to stay summer sane.

Yard Etc. is a collection designed for garden enthusiasts, by garden enthusiasts in Sweden. The brand philosophy eschews gloves, and understands the true gardener’s desire to get their hands in the dirt (and make the cleanup process equally gratifying). With plant-based, effective formulations, from an outstanding green tomato hand soap to their reparative hand balm, Yard Etc.’s handsomely-packaged line covers all bases, whether you’re the gardener of estate grounds or a single succulent.

More at: Yard Etc.

Weekend Listening / Viewing: Keys N Krates – Save Me

Directed by Adam Beck & Paul Johnston.

The Swimming Pools of Alberto Campo Baeza

While the weather is scorching hot in New York City, it is a great time to daydream about the perfect open air swimming pool. I’m not talking about the cloyingly chlorinated rooftop “member’s only” vats that seem to be city crossroads of vulgarians, but instead the thoughtfully placed, elegant pool that is at peace with its environment, and is as inviting as it is a compliment to architecture or landscape.

Spanish architect Alberto Campo Baeza is a genius of sorts when it comes to pools, their proportion to structure, and involving them in the poetry of space. Here are five striking designs from Estudio Campo Baeza that beautifully incorporate the swimming pool.

House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza
House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza
House of the Infinite (2014), Cádiz, photos by Javier Callejas

 

Rufo House by Alberto Campo Baeza

Rufo House (2009), Toledo, photo by Javier Callejas

 

Gaspar House by Alberto Campo Baeza

Gaspar House, Cádiz (1992), photo by Hisao Suzuki

 

De Blas House by Alberto Campo Baeza

De Blas House, Madrid (2000), photo by Hisao Suzuki

 

Casa Guerrero by Alberto Campo Baeza

Guerrero House, Cádiz (2005), photo by Roland Halbe

 

More at: Alberto Campo Baeza

Weekend Listening / Viewing: Hurts – Some Kind of Heaven

Directed by Chino Moya.