The Aesthetic Post


The Chair and Footstool by Hansen

Hansen Furniture

Hansen Furniture

Not in production since the late 1970s, Danish brand Hansen has relaunched their designs for today’s market. Determined to pursue the family’s work and dedication to quality materials and craftsmanship, Michael Hansen and his father John are reintroducing the footstool and chair models from 1959, originally designed by Eiler Hansen, available in five new colors.

The pieces were introduced to Danish homes around the time of the television, when a seat was a hot commodity. Hansen insisted that the design be well proportioned, functional and comfortable, with clean lines; the footstool works as not only a leg rest, but an extra seat.

Hansen Furniture

Hansen Furniture

These icons are characterized by outstanding craftsmanship, minimalist but unique design, and an inherent sense of quality. The carefully chosen materials include fabrics from some of the world’s leading weaving mills, as well as a frame of solid beech, grown in the forest of Lolland-Falster in the South of Denmark.

The pieces can be ordered directly from Hansen’s site; the footstool at 180€ and the chair 340€.

More at: Hansen

Malfatti Glass

Malfatti Glass

Malfatti Glass

Malfatti Glass is a collection of drinking and serving glassware, handblown and delicately formed from durable borosilicate glass (the same you’d find in a laboratory). Each piece is one-of-a-kind and organically-shaped, which leads to the name Malfatti, translated from Italian as “misshapen.”

The line features a full range of sizes and form, from stemless celebration glasses ($66/pair) to gelato bowls ($60/pair); considering their quality and uniqueness, these sets would make for a smart, understated gift.

Malfatti is just one facet of Beacon, New York-based Ten Willow Studio, comprised of Daniel Spitzer, master glassblower and former Dale Chihuly crew member, and Jill Reynolds, an award-winning visual artist know for her innovative use of flameworked glass.

More at: Malfatti Glass
Photography: Meredith Heuer

“Skylights” by CoeLux

CoeLux Skylight

CoeLux Skylight

CoeLux Skylight

CoeLux is a new kind of lighting technology that expertly (it was conceived by a group of Italian scientists) recreates the effect of a skylight. The exacts of the design are proprietary, but apparently it involves LED light filtered through a complex optical layer that mimics Earth’s atmosphere and the effect known as Rayleigh scattering. The color and intensities very directly simulate sunlight, and none of the photos you see here have been digitally altered for effect.

CoeLux can be configured to replicate sunlight in different geographic scenarios, including tropical, Mediterranean, and Nordic, where, for example, light flows at a lower angle relative to the horizon.

There is no denying the aesthetic and psychological effects of bringing sunlight into interior environments, but in many cases, the real thing just isn’t an option; this revolutionary technology could shift interiors drastically, from geographic positions where daylight is scarce, to places like hospitals and even subway stations.

More at: CoeLux

Last-Minute Valentine’s Day Gift Guide

2015 Valentine Gift Guide

Sure, Valentine’s Day is a consumerism-based spectacle that we should all forfeit, but in lieu of disposable, heart-shaped drugstore purchases, a thoughtful gift: be it a lavish candle or a simple home-cooked dinner, should be met with welcome by any lover (or your loveless self).

Here are some ideas that will not disappoint; and if you enjoy spending time in the kitchen, head over to Saveur for a great guide to Valentine’s Day cooking, from breakfast in bed to romantic cocktails.

As for flowers, we’ll talk about that tomorrow . . . 

1. Eating with the Chefs, $60; 2. Nikka Whisky, $40; 3. Fred’s Peppered Peanuts, $38;
4. Japanese Folding Knife, $28; 5. Balmain Silk Hair Perfume, $40; 6. Rodin Lip Balm, $34;
7. Byredo Loveless Candle, $80

Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost

Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost

Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost

Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost

A series of shallow salt evaporation ponds designed to produce salt from sea water or brine are situated just south of San Francisco; water is fed into these ponds and drawn out through natural evaporation, which allows for a harvest of five to eight inches of salt per pond.

The most unusual aspect of this process is the coloration that occurs naturally as a result of microorganisms thriving as salinity levels increase. The specific colors indicate salt content as well as the type of microorganism breeding within, and during the waters evolution, which can take up to five years, the microorganisms shift color alongside the water’s organic changes.

The existence of these organisms and algae make for more than an exciting and strange color show, but a rich ecosystem, supporting millions of shorebirds, waterfowl, and other wildlife, whilst regulating water conditions to develop higher quality salts.

This curiosity of nature has been artfully captured by photographer Julieanne Kost during a decidedly purple period, illustrating not only the surprising colors, but the striking geographic orientation of the ponds.

More at: Julieanne Kost (Behance)

Honne – All In The Value

Directed by Geej Ower.

Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

Holiday Gift Guide

1. Hide and Seek: The Architecture of Cabins and Hide-Outs, $42; 2. Tom Dixon Spice Grinder, $125
3. Snow Peak Titanium Coffee Press, $60; 4. PLANT Face Oil, $30; 5. Bang & Olufsen BeoPlay A2 Speaker, $399

Holiday Gift Guide

6. Umbra Shift/Paul Loebach Cup Lamp, $180; 7. RS Barcelona Mon Oncle Grill, $375; 8. Mad et Len Graphite Candle, $90; 9. 11+ World Desk Clock, $49; 10. Midori Brass Pencil Case, $68

Christmas Fir Cabin Spray by Juniper Ridge

Juniper Ridge Cabin Spray

All too often, evergreen candles and room sprays smell more like the grocery store cleaning aisle than an actual forest, not the case with Juniper Ridge’s Christmas Fir Cabin Spray.

If this isn’t your year for a fresh-cut tree, or you just love the fragrance of the outdoors inside, forgo the synthetic candle recreation and go straight to the source: utilizing traditional methods of steam-distillation, enfleurage, tincture, and infusion, the spray is made from fir, cedar, and pine, all wild-harvested in the Pacific Northwest.

Juniper Ridge

Juniper Ridge

Juniper Ridge

Founded in 1998 by wilderness enthusiast Hall Newbegin, Juniper Ridge approaches fragrance in a way that is both industry defiant and historic, as the techniques used are the same as 100 years ago. Forgoing mass production, synthetics, and excessive description, the scents speak entirely for themselves, and rely on nature to dictate the notes, harvest-to-harvest.

Juniper Ridge

If you’re more interested in provenance, Juniper Ridge has a collection of cabin sprays, each dedicated to its place of harvest, as well as their complete line of personal fragrance and product.

2 oz single-batch Christmas Fir Cabin Spray, $30

More at: Juniper Ridge
Photos: Juniper Ridge

The Eisbach by Thomas Prior

Thomas Prior

Thomas Prior

Thomas Prior

Thomas Prior

Thomas Prior

Thomas Prior is a New York-based photographer; while Prior shoots a wide range of subject matter, his work has a clean, hyper-real mood that makes for photos that can be both subversive and arresting.

This series was taken at the Eisbach (German for “ice brook”), a small channel branching off the Isar River in downtown Munich; at one section, there is an artificial wave that has been ridden by “river surfers” since 1972.

More at: Thomas Prior

Black Atlass – Jewels

Directed by Yoann Lemoine (Woodkid), featuring Anja Rubik.